5th AVENUE SYNAGOGUE WILL BE CLOSED TO JEWS THIS COMING SABBATH

Just imagine the uproar if the above headline was true …

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BUT …..

The silence is once again deafening when Muslims are barred from THEIR place of worship on THEIR Holy Day …

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Israel bans Muslims from Ibrahimi Mosque Thursday, Friday

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(MaanImages/File)
HEBRON (Ma’an) — The Ibrahimi Mosque in Hebron will be closed to Muslim worshipers on Thursday and Friday, an official at the mosque told Ma’an Sunday.Hijazi Abu Sneina told Ma’an the mosque would be open to Israeli settlers during the two days of Rosh Hashanah, or Jewish New Year, but closed to Muslims.

The Ibrahimi Mosque, believed to be the burial place of the prophet Abraham, is located in central Hebron, a frequent site of tensions due to the presence of 500 Israeli settlers in the Old City.

A 1997 agreement split Hebron into areas of Palestinian and Israeli control.

More than 500,000 Israeli settlers live in settlements across the West Bank and East Jerusalem, in contravention of international law.

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Is this what we can expect next?

Is this what we can expect next?

HELL NO, HE WON’T GO! ~~ OUR KIND OF HERO

pinkprotest_LargeWide

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Ferera refuses to serve in the IDF, which he regards as an army of occupation, and is unwilling to ask for an exemption on mental-health grounds. “If you ask for an exemption for physical or psychological reasons,” he explains, “you are telling the army: The problem is me. But I am saying: The problem is you.”

“Refusal is my tool of protest. Whoever wants peace should not do army service. I am doing the most useful thing to change the situation: I am not going to be inducted. I want to show that there are people who think differently, who refuse to obey.”

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A different brand of refusenik

Argentine-born, religiously observant Uriel Ferera has been in military prison seven times and is willing to go back – as long as his protest is heard loud and clear.

By Gideon Levy and Alex Levac FOR
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Uriel Ferera
Uriel Ferera. Photo by Alex Levac
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A few times during our conversation he burst into tears. Uriel Ferera cried when he recalled how he was forced to put on an Israel Defense Forces uniform in prison and then looked in the mirror. He couldn’t bear what he saw. He removed the uniform, sat on the floor of the cell and wept.

He’s crying again now, after serving months in Military Prison 6. Last week he finished his seventh term. He’s spent a total of 127 days in jail, and his story is far from being over. After Rosh Hashanah, he will report to the IDF induction center again, and will probably be sent back to jail for an eighth time.

When we first met a few weeks ago, during a break between prison terms, my impression was that Ferera, 19, was a sensitive young man suffering from some form of post-traumatic stress disorder, caused by his experience in jail. He’s become more resilient since then.

Ferera refuses to serve in the IDF, which he regards as an army of occupation, and is unwilling to ask for an exemption on mental-health grounds. “If you ask for an exemption for physical or psychological reasons,” he explains, “you are telling the army: The problem is me. But I am saying: The problem is you.”

Nor is he ready to make do with refusal to serve only in the territories – the entire army, wherever it is deployed, is tainted by the crime of occupation, he believes – nor with finding a way to avoid serving, without stating his intentions publicly. Ferera wants to his protest to be heard loud and clear, and is ready to take the consequences.

There are other refuseniks, too, but none quite like Ferera. Born in Buenos Aires, he is religiously observant; he’s growing a beard and his earlocks are pushed back behind his ears. The graduate of a high-school yeshiva who grew up in a poor neighborhood of Be’er Sheva, he has a profile that’s quite different from that of the usual refusenik. Maybe that’s why the army is so obsessed with incarcerating him.

When we met, several weeks ago in Tel Aviv (more recently, we have spoken by phone), he said he wanted to talk in an open setting – he dislikes closed places after so many months in prison. He would not eat anything after discovering that the café where we met is open on Shabbat and thus not kosher.

Ferera’s mother, Ruth, a photographer, immigrated to Israel with him and his sister for economic reasons; he was six. Ruth wanted to live in Jerusalem but they ended up in Be’er Sheva. In Argentina she had been active in a right-wing Jewish organization, but her views subsequently changed.

Uriel attended a state-religious primary school and then a Be’er Sheva yeshiva. His views were greatly influenced by his mother, he says. The rabbi at his yeshiva told him he’d never before encountered opinions like his.

“What made my mother reverse her opinions was the assassination of [Prime Minister Yitzhak] Rabin,” Ferera says. “She’s convinced that peace is possible and that doing army service works in the opposite way. It’s all due to the occupation. If I do army service, I will be contributing to the occupation, even if I am not posted to the territories. Even all the office jobs in the IDF constitute collaboration, and I don’t want to have anything to do with the army.

“Refusal is my tool of protest. Whoever wants peace should not do army service. I am doing the most useful thing to change the situation: I am not going to be inducted. I want to show that there are people who think differently, who refuse to obey.”

Testimonies of soldiers compiled by the Breaking the Silence organization helped Uriel and his mother solidify their stand against the IDF.

“It is not a defense army,” he explains. “The soldiers who serve in the territories abuse people only to make Palestinians afraid and show them who’s in charge. The whole army hides behind [the concept of] ‘defending the homeland.’ But it’s not defense. Real defense means leaving the territories. The state is using the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to hide the real problem: the social-economic situation.”

Ferera is ready to serve the state in the framework of a year of national service, as his sister did, “but the army doesn’t want me to serve the state, and the state doesn’t want me to contribute to it. All it wants is for me to serve in the army.”

His decision to refuse was made early, at age 14. Upon receiving his first call-up notice, he made his intention known to the authorities. He was in touch with New Profile and Yesh Gvul, NGOs that encourage refusal to serve in the IDF. He also posted a clip on YouTube, in Spanish and Hebrew, explaining his decision. His mother wrote proudly on her Facebook page: “My son is a refusenik.”

Ferera reported to the National Induction Center on April 27, 2014 – a day he will never forget. “I was really afraid of what was going to happen. I was afraid of going to jail. But I told myself: I am doing the right thing.”

Initially, he was incarcerated in an “irregulars cell” – where prisoners who present behavioral problems are held – at the center. That was the first “boom,” as he puts it. That afternoon he was sentenced to 20 days in prison.

At Military Prison 6, near Atlit, south of Haifa, he was placed in solitary confinement after refusing to wear a prison uniform – that is, an IDF uniform. The guards told him that because he was in isolation, he would not be permitted to attend a minyan (prayer quorum).

The prison guide put out by New Profile had prepared him for the worst. He wore his T-shirt, which bears a message of solidarity with another refusenik, the Druze musician Omar Saad; when he refused to put on the uniform a guard screamed at him.

“That broke me, when he started screaming,” Ferera recalls. “I had a panic attack. I sat on the floor, shaking. I was afraid I would go out of my mind.”

The guard was certain that Ferera was putting on a show, but Ferera went on weeping. A prison company commander who was called in was unable to calm him. The guard picked him up, and he was taken forcefully to the isolation ward.

Ferera: “I felt so helpless. I started to pray and recite Psalms. I shouted to God in Spanish: Get me out of here. They laughed at me. They said God would not listen to me, and would not get me out of there. They were robots. Not listening, not thinking. I was proud not to be like them. I thought: If this is how they belittle me and use force on me, imagine what they do to Palestinian youths. I told myself that I would come out crazy if I went on like that. I decided to put on the uniform, so I wouldn’t come out traumatized, to preserve my mental health.”

His fixes his gaze on the floor as he relates his story. He says the prison guards treated him as though he were a murderer. Letters from his mother, in which she wrote how proud she is, strengthened him, he explains. Other letters of support that were sent did not reach him, with the authorities claiming they were political.

As punishment for the initial incident with the uniform, he was deprived of his prison privileges for a few days. When he came home on his first furlough, his mother told him he had to try to preserve his sanity: “Reduce your pacifist pride, put on the uniform and don’t give them reasons to abuse you.”

In the meantime, Ferera has been in and out of prison, and this will continue until the IDF finally decides to discharge him as unqualified to serve. He is now aiming to get a hearing before the committee that makes those decisions.

Saad spent a total of 190 days in prison; another conscientious objector, Natan Blanc, was incarcerated for 175 days before being discharged. Ferera has been jailed for 127 days so far. After Rosh Hashanah, he is likely to be locked up, yet again.

In response to a request for commment, the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit told Haaretz this week: “The soldier in question did not cooperate with induction officials after an authorized body denied his request to be exempted from service on grounds of conscience. A request to convene a committee that will determine incompatibility to serve will be examined by relevant elements in the IDF…. In contrast with what was claimed, the soldier was not subject to any offensive treatment on the part of prison staff, and during his incarceration received the same, proper treatment given to other soldiers.”

Ferera followed the IDF operation in the Gaza Strip from his prison cell, surrounded by AWOL soldiers who wanted the army to pummel the Gazans even harder. He has an especially high regard for the refuseniks of Unit 8200 of the Intelligence Corps, who wrote a letter of protest against the occupation this week, because they come from inside the system. Ferera says he will not give up on the idea of doing a year of national service instead of being in the army.

“I will show them that I did not crack and that they wasted time in which I could have been doing National Service,” he asserts.

Is he sorry he immigrated to Israel? Ferera ponders this briefly, then replies: “No. Why should I be sorry? Even though I am not a Zionist at all, I did the right thing. By the same token, I know it is possible to leave Israel. I am not connected to the country, to love of the Land of Israel, but I am not sorry I came here. The truth is that I never even considered that question. The solution is not to flee, the solution is to try and struggle – and try to change things. I am fighting so that this will be a good country for all its citizens.”

PROTECTING PAMELA GELLER’S 1st AMENDMENT RIGHTS MORE IMPORTANT THAN TRASHING ISLAM

‘If you are white and can afford it you can say anything you want about someone!’

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The MTA said the ads violated its “no demeaning” language policy. But a judge ruled that rejecting the ads violated Geller’s First Amendment rights.

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Shocking anti-Islam ad campaign coming to MTA buses, subway stations

JENNIFER FERMINO FOR

Pamela Geller is launching a bunch of bus ads that feature Adolf Hitler.

An incendiary ad campaign that includes an image of American journalist James Foley just before his beheading in Syria is coming to 100 MTA buses and two subway stations.

The ads, paid for by flame-throwing blogger Pamela Geller, at a cost of $100,000, are intended as an “education campaign” to warn of the “problem with jihad” and Islamic sharia law, Geller said.

In one of the placard ads, Foley appears handcuffed, on his knees, next to the hooded, black-clad jihadist who is about to execute him — an image from the video released by the group Islamic State, which boasted of the execution.

The ad also contains a second photo, of the Briton suspected by some of being Foley’s killer. The Brit is shown in happier times, before he allegedly joined ISIS.

“Yesterday’s moderate is today’s headline,” the placard says.

A second ad contains a 1940s photo of a pro-Nazi Palestinian leader chatting with Adolf Hitler under the headline, “Islamic Jew-Hatred: It’s in the Quran.”

In addition to the 100 buses, Geller’s ads will appear at the entrances of the E. 59th St. station on the Lexington Ave. line and the Columbus Circle station.

In a statement to the Daily News on Friday, Mayor de Blasio said, “These ads are outrageous, inflammatory and wrong, and have no place in New York City, or anywhere. These hateful messages serve only to divide and stigmatize when we should be coming together as one city.”

He added, “While those behind these ads only display their irresponsible intolerance, the rest of us who may be forced to view them can take comfort in the knowledge that we share a better, loftier and nobier view of humanity.”

Geller is a prolific blogger who writes of a “global jihad conspiracy” and calls President Obama a “clown” and an “Islamic apologist.” Told of de Blasio’s criticism, she said, “Doesn’t Mayor de Blasio have bigger fish to fry?…New York is the softest terror target.”

Her ads will surely offend some bus and subway riders, but the MTA said it has no choice but to allow them.

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi

ALLISON JOYCE/ALLISON JOYCE FOR THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

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Pamela Geller, creators of the anti-jihad subway ads, speaks at an MTA meeting two years ago.

It tried to block Geller several years ago when she wanted to post ads in the subway that labeled enemies of Israel as “savages.”

The MTA said the ads violated its “no demeaning” language policy. But a judge ruled that rejecting the ads violated Geller’s First Amendment rights.

“If you read the court decision on this, our hands are tied,” said MTA spokesman Adam Lisberg.

Following that battle, the MTA updated its policy to force all viewpoint ads like Geller’s to contain language clearly stating that the opinions expressed are not the transit agency’s.

Geller’s new ads will contain the disclaimer.

In addition to the ads featuring Foley and Hitler, Geller has created a placard that links the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim civil rights group known as CAIR, to the terror organization Hamas.

“Geller is a known hater and there’s no law in this country that forces her to tell the truth,” said Corey Saylor, a CAIR spokesman.

He said the group has considered suing her, but doesn’t think it’s worth it.

“Defamation law being what it is in this country, we understand it would be difficult,” he said.

WORSE THAN ISIS???

'Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

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WASHINGTON – While the Islamic State group is getting the most attention now, another band of extremists in Syria – a mix of hardened jihadis from Afghanistan, Yemen, Syria and Europe – poses a more direct and imminent threat to the United States, working with Yemeni bomb-makers to target US aviation, American officials said.

 

Full AP Report HERE

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Compliments of Michael Rivero @ WRH

Compliments of Michael Rivero @ WRH

TEST YOUR POWER OF PRAYER

Feel free to add your own favourites and pass this on …

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the-power-of-prayer

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Dear Lord:
This past year has been tough.

You’ve taken my favorite actor, James Garner; my favorite actress, Lauren Bacall; my favorite comedian, Robin Williams; and finally, my favorite author, Tom Clancy.

I just wanted You to know that my favorite politicians are: Bibi Netanyahu, Avigdor Lieberman, Mahmoud Abbas, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi and  Hillary Clinton.

Amen.

SPOOF ON SCOTLAND’S ‘DEPENDENCE’

The sun is yet to set on the Empire …

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'Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

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New York Times Report below

Scots Reject Independence From Britain in Historic Vote

HERE’S HOW PALESTINIANS WILL LIVE IN A ONE STATE SOLUTION

Annexation of West Bank=One State Solution

Annexation of West Bank=One State Solution

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A must read for anyone who still supports that ‘solution …

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The norms proper to a true democracy obligate the state to take steps to promote equality of opportunity and implement a policy of narrowing the gaps in land allocations. Instead, it has responded with a series of laws, including the one allowing small communities to set up admissions committees, that send the following unequivocal message: This is a Jewish state; Arabs out.

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Israel’s discriminatory housing message: This is a Jewish state; Arabs out

Both the Israeli establishment and the greater public have completely disregarded the dire statistics about the the Arab community’s housing shortage.

By Jack Khoury FOR

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Adel Kaadan

Adel Kaadan outside his home in the town of Katzir, which challenged his right to live there because he is Arab.Photo by Moran Mayan / Jini

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Every time the issue of Arabs living in small rural Jewish communities arises, the same question arises: Would Arabs be willing to let Jews live in their small rural communities? The goal of this question is to throw the ball back into the Arabs’ court and portray them as the bad guys, who don’t want Jews in their villages, and therefore have no right to demand to live in equivalent Jewish communities.

But the people who raise this claim ignore several important facts in an attempt to justify a fundamentally racist and discriminatory policy.

First, all the Arab villages – without exception – existed even before the state was established, and the vast majority of their houses were built on privately owned land that the owners inherited from their forebears, not on land provided by the state. Most of the rural Jewish communities, in contrast, were built on state land based on terms set by the state, and according to the High Court of Justice’s precedent-setting ruling in the Kaadan case in 2000, the state cannot discriminate in allocating land on the basis of a person’s ethnic or national background.

Second, Arab citizens of Israel currently own only about five percent of the country’s land, because most of what was once Arab-owned land has been expropriated over the years since 1948 via a series of draconian laws and decisions. In contrast, the regional councils where most of the Jewish communities in question are located control about 70 percent of the country’s land.

The fact that Arabs are barred from living in these areas due to their ethnicity, while almost any Jewish citizen who meets the relevant socioeconomic criteria can live there, means that Jews have considerably more options than Arabs when it comes to choosing a place to live.

Both the Israeli establishment and the greater public have completely disregarded the dire statistics about the the Arab community’s housing shortage, which stems from blatant discrimination in the allocation of land, the expansion of existing communities’ jurisdictions and the approval of master plans. There is an urgent need for tens of thousands of houses for young Arab couples. “Where will we build our house and raise our children?” has become the problem that keeps such couples awake at night, and the options available to them are steadily shrinking.

Every young couple, even an Arab couple, is entitled to aspire to a decent standard of living in every area of life. But instead of enjoying their rights as citizens, striving to realize this aspiration and being able to talk about fair allocations of land and equality of opportunity, Arab citizens feel they are being pushed further and further into a corner. Arabs are searching for any possible solution, including the option of living in small Jewish communities, not out of a desire for separatism, but out of a desire to integrate.

The norms proper to a true democracy obligate the state to take steps to promote equality of opportunity and implement a policy of narrowing the gaps in land allocations. Instead, it has responded with a series of laws, including the one allowing small communities to set up admissions committees, that send the following unequivocal message: This is a Jewish state; Arabs out.

THE US IS GUILTY OF CRIMES IN GAZA … BUT NOT YET CHARGED

gazaNOVEMBER

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The U.S. is not a neutral mediator in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict; it is an active participant and is guilty of the crimes being committed by Israel against Palestinians, most recently, the mass killings and destruction Israel wrought on the Gaza Strip during the summer. The reality that the U.S. is an active supporter of unimaginable suffering may very well be the motivating force behind the U.S.’s adamant attempts to block the Palestinians from using any of the internationally recognized tools of accountability to hold Israel responsible, such as the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court. When an indigenous, stateless population is blocked access to opportunities for justice by superpowers like the U.S., something is wrong—deadly wrong.

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US guilty of war crimes in Palestine 

The U.S. is not a neutral mediator in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict; it is an active participant and is guilty of the crimes being committed by Israel against Palestinians, most recently, the mass killings and destruction Israel wrought on the Gaza Strip during the summer. The reality that the U.S. is an active supporter of unimaginable suffering may very well be the motivating force behind the U.S.’s adamant attempts to block the Palestinians from using any of the internationally recognized tools of accountability to hold Israel responsible, such as the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court. When an indigenous, stateless population is blocked access to opportunities for justice by superpowers like the U.S., something is wrong—deadly wrong.

While Israeli bombs were hammering Gaza, Alice Lynd with the assistance of Staughton Lynd, drafted a 32-page pamphlet which was published by the Palestine-Israel Working Group of Historians Against the War (HAW) titled, Violations by Israel and the Problem of Enforcement (August 2014). The policy paper places the U.S. in front of its own mirror and meticulously documents how one hand of the U.S. government systematically documents Israeli violations of U.S. law and international law, while the other hand unconditionally dishes out financial, military, and diplomatic support to Israel.

The study notes that “United States law states that no military assistance will be provided to a government that engages in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights. Yet the United States gives more military assistance to Israel than to any other country, currently in excess of $3.1 billion per year. The U.S. participates in joint military exercises, military research, and weapons development.”
This contradiction of its own policy would seem incriminating enough, but if all the other means of U.S. support to Israel are added—especially the U.S.’s unwavering role in the UN Security Council as a proxy for Israel’s interests by vetoing and thereby blocking international steps for justice—the evidence that the U.S. is an active player in Israel’s onslaught and continued military occupation becomes overwhelming.

It stands to reason that the U.S. very rightly fears that any step to hold Israel accountable for crimes against humanity would ultimately incriminate the U.S. as Israel’s funder, diplomatic cover, political handler, and arms supplier for decades.

While this new document was being researched, the Historians Against the War circulated a letter to President Obama and members of Congress that begins: “We deplore the ongoing attacks against civilians in Gaza and in Israel. We also recognize the disproportionate harm that the Israeli military, which the United States has armed and supported for decades, is inflicting on the population of Gaza.” (July 31, 2014). The pamphlet’s contents strike this point home with incriminating details.

The pamphlet quotes historian Robin D. G. Kelley who recently said about the ongoing conflict, “Determining next steps requires that we go back many steps—before the siege, before the election of Hamas, before the withdrawal of Jewish settlements in Gaza, before the Oslo Accords, even before the strip came under Israeli occupation in 1967.” (“When the smoke clears in Gaza,” Aug. 8, 2014, Black Educator).

I had the honor of working with both authors of this pamphlet following the First Gulf War (1990-1991) when they suggested we co-edit an oral history of Palestine as a tool to understand the centrality of Palestine to the entire destabilization of the Middle East, a reality that is even more true today. Following several field visits to the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Israel, and the Golan Heights, that effort resulted in the publishing of Homeland: Oral History of Palestine and Palestinians (1993). Their new effort revisits many familiar topics that we addressed in our book, with chapter headings such as International Agreements and U.S. Law, International Agreements on Human Rights, U.S. Law on Foreign Assistance, Violations of Internationally Recognized Human Rights, Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, Arbitrary Arrest or Detention, Collective Punishment, among many more.

Perhaps the most important chapter in this brief pamphlet is “The Problem of Enforcement.” One need not be a historian or political scientist to understand that as long as global enforcement mechanisms of accountability are denied to Palestinians due to the political whims of a superpower, Israel has the green light to attack Gaza and the West Bank at any time with impunity.

Israel’s senseless military attack this summer (deceptively coined “Operation Protective Edge” in English, and more accurately “Solid Cliff” in Hebrew) left 2,168 Palestinians dead, more than 500 of them children. The Institute for Middle East Understanding compared the proportionate impact of these deaths to the population in the U.S. Gaza’s devastating human loss would be equivalent to 376,680 Americans killed in 51 days if such events were undertaken in the U.S. To put this in perspective, this number is slightly fewer than the 407,000 U.S. soldiers killed in World War II. It is not hyperbole to say that everyone in Gaza knows at least one person who died or was injured in this atrocity, with each person left wondering if he or she would be next.

If humanity is to be served, citizens who believe in equal access to international tools of justice must speak up and denounce the continued U.S. hegemony over Palestine. If you support nonviolent means for addressing crimes against humanity—especially if you are American or Israeli—act now by contacting your elected representative to demand a change in policy so that marginalized populations are not shut out of systems of justice when they are the victims of crimes against humanity. Holding individuals responsible for their crimes is a core American value; it’s a value we should not compromise for any country, especially our own.

 

Written FOR

ILLUSIONS AND REALITIES IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE TODAY

AMERICA DON’T WORRY, ISRAEL IS BEHIND YOU

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AFTER ALL ….. YOU PAYED FOR THE BOMBER PICTURED ABOVE …

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Liberman to Kerry: We’ll Help Fight ISIS

Speaking to US Secretary of State John Kerry, Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman said that Israel was prepared to help defeat Islamic State.
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Israel is ready, willing, and able to help the US in the fight against ISIS, Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman told US Secretary of State John Kerry. In a meeting late Wednesday in Washington with Kerry, Liberman said that Israel realized the sensitivity of the situation, and that Israel would take on whatever role it could in order to beat back ISIS, which is a threat to Israeli interests, as well as US interests.
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Report HERE
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AND …. for every $100 donated to the JNF you can get this for free
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America Don’t Worry – Israel is Behind You T-Shirt

This humorous shirt, featuring an Israeli F-16 fighter jet, shows the close relationship between Israel and it’s longstanding ally, the United States of America.

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HURRY WHILE THE SUPPLY LASTS ;)

THE END OF THE DIASPORA?

It ain't gonna happen

It ain’t gonna happen

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First read THIS from the archives

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Just imagine much of Brooklyn or Miami Beach turning into ghost towns …. not to mention the ‘burbs’. 

Israelis are getting bolder (or dumber) by the day as can be seen in the latest poll regarding WHO’S A JEW …

Just how would Israel survive if they got their way?

Talk about alienation …

Can you imagine an America without a Foxman or a Wiesenthal Centre? Do you think they are prepared to give up their high paying jobs to move to Israel?

HA!
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Not to mention THESE people …

Poll: One-third of Israelis think about leaving

Poll by Israel’s Channel 2 reveals sense of despondency among many residents. Though most would never leave, attitudes on emigration soften.

Click HERE to read report

BUT …

Opinion poll on Jewish identity finds a third of Israelis believe that to be considered a Jew, one has to live in Israel; only quarter of public believe that a Jew is anyone who calls himself one.

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'You can't be a Jew outside of Israel'

‘You can’t be a Jew outside of Israel’

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Poll: Majority of Israelis stringently define Jews

Opinion poll on Jewish identity finds a third of Israelis believe that to be considered a Jew, one has to live in Israel; only quarter of public believe that a Jew is anyone who calls himself one.

Kobi Nachshoni

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Fifty-eight percent of Israelis define a Jew as someone who is the child of a Jewish mother, a poll conducted by BINA, the Center for Jewish Identity & Hebrew Culture revealed on Wednesday.

Ahead of the Jewish holidays and following the controversy surrounding the “conversion law”, the poll seeked to determine the public’s opinion regarding questions that have been preoccupying Israel for decades – who is a Jew?

Alarming Figures

The poll was conducted by the Geocartography research institute among a nationwide representative sample of 500 respondents – a representative sample of the adult Jewish population in Israel.

Results of the poll showed that 58% of Israelis believe that any child born of a Jewish mother is a Jew; 26% said that a Jew is “anyone who defines himself as Jewish and wishes to be considered one”.

The findings also revealed that 6% of of respondents believe that only those who believe in God and are committed to the commandments of the Torah and the Jewish law are considered Jews, while 6% think that a Jew is anyone who is involved in Jewish studies (for example out of interest or as part of an academic education). The other respondents answered: “none of the above”, “all are equally Jewish”, or “I don’t know”.

The results analysis shows that the younger part of the group is more faithful to the Jewish tradition on that particular issue than the rest of the sample group: The younger the respondent is, the more he sanctifies the Halachic criterion of the Jewish mother (they are also those who believe that every Jew should have faith in God and observe the Jewish Mitzvot).

At the same time the number of those who believe that a Jew is someone who considers himself as one, is declining. Segmentation using religious definitions indicates that 42% of secular Jews acknowledge the Jewishness of anyone who claims to be Jewish – in contrast to just 15% among conservative Jews and 3% among ultra-Orthodox Jews who would not agree with such an assertion.

Among the ultra-Orthodox Jews, 86% believe that a Jew is one who was born to a Jewish mother, in contrast to 63% conservative Jews and 43.5% secular Jews.

In the second part of the survey, the participants were presented with several possibilities that express Jewish identity and were required to choose the one to which they felt more connected; 30% chose living in Israel, usage of the Hebrew language and army service in the IDF.

Among the results, 27% of Israelis felt that Jewish culture and traditions are key aspects of Jewish identity, 18% chose observance of Jewish law, and 13% express their Judiasm by observing the Sabbath with their family.

Here too, in comparison to other respondents, the younger respondents chose less “civilian” characteristics such as IDF military service, speaking Hebrew and living in Israel as elements of their Jewish identity. They gave more weight to the Jewish mitzvoth, culture and tradition.

Among the adults the trend was just the opposite. Naturally, these patterns encompass the secular, conservative and ultra-Orthodox Jews.

BINA director Eran Baruch said that the “survey voices one of the most central ideas we believe in – that believing in god and observing the mitzvoth are not the only ways to engage in Judaism. There are various ways to be Jewish”.

“The survey shows the diversity of the Israeli public regarding its Jewish identity: nationalistic and cultural components such as language and military service along with a warm approach to the Jewish tradition such as celebrating the holidays with the family – all these serve as a central part of the Israeli Jewish identity.

“We encourage Israeli Jews – secular, conservative and ultra-Orthodox – to take an interest in Judaism in its many layers and connect to it by choice and out of identification with it.”

#FloodWallStreet … SAVE THE WORLD!

(Image Courtesy of Flood Wall Street)

(Image Courtesy of Flood Wall Street)

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What does climate change have to do with capitalism? According to “Flood Wall Street” organizers, who are part of a mass people’s response to the upcoming United Nations Climate Summit in New York City, the answer is simple: Everything.

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Aiming at Roots of Climate Chaos,

‘Flood Wall Street’ Targets Capitalism

Itself

Ahead of UN summit, organizers of direct action say the planetary crisis of global warming ‘is a result of an economic system that is based on endless extraction, endless growth, and ceaseless exploitation of the earth and people.’

by Sarah Lazare, staff writer for
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What does climate change have to do with capitalism? According to “Flood Wall Street” organizers, who are part of a mass people’s response to the upcoming United Nations Climate Summit in New York City, the answer is simple: Everything.

To illustrate this, thousands of people on Monday, September 22 will bring the climate crisis to the doorsteps of the financial institutions underpinning the capitalist economic system by “flooding” New York’s Wall Street district with a mass sit-in of people donning blue and bearing a 300-foot banner that reads “Capitalism = Climate Chaos. Flood Wall Street.”

Organizers of the protest told Common Dreams that 400 people from across the country have already committed to risking arrest in the direct action and they expect that number to grow. Many more, they say, will attend the protest as supporters of the civil disobedience. “It’s going to be a sea of blue evocative of Hurricane Sandy that’s going to flood the financial district,” organizer Michael Premo told Common Dreams.

This action is targeting capitalism itself because “the climate crisis fundamentally is a result of an economic system that is based on endless extraction, endless growth, and ceaseless exploitation of the earth and people,” explained Premo. “A lot of the small incremental changes that have been touted over the last decade as addressing the situation are just band-aids. If there is any hope of building  a more ecologically sustainable and socially equitable economy, we have to start at the root.”

Monday’s direct action will kick off with a 9:00 am demonstration in Battery Park, which will include music from New York City radical marching band the Rude Mechanical Orchestra, to be followed by speakers including Naomi Klein, Rebecca Solnit, and leaders from the Climate Justice Alliance. Protesters will then march to the New York Stock Exchange, where the direct action will take place at noon. The organizers of the protest do not hail from a single group but constitute a network of “Occupy Wall Street veterans, student divestment activists, housing activists, artists and more,” according to a press statement.

The protest is a response to a recent call to action from Climate Justice Alliance, a global coalition of indigenous peoples, people of color, and poor and working class communities bearing the brunt of the climate crisis. “From Mesa to Mountaintop, from Hood to Holler—join us as we meet the scale and urgency of the crisis by standing in solidarity with all frontlines of resistance and resilience around the world, and taking non-violent direct action against the corporations driving the extractive economy,” reads the statement from the group.

“We are flooding Wall Street to stop its financing of planetary destruction, and make way for living economies that benefit people and planet,” said Michael Leon Guerrero of the Climate Justice Alliance. “Communities that are first and most impacted by storms, floods and droughts are also on the frontlines of fighting the dig, burn, dump economy causing climate change.”

But these communities are not invited to the UN summit of government representatives, corporations, financial institutions, and select civil society organizations that will take place at the UN headquarters in New York City on September 23rd. Last week a global coalition of social movement organizations, including La Via Campesina and Grassroots Global Justice Alliance, slammed the “corporate takeover” and “false promises” of the meeting.

Grassroots creative actions and events will take place outside UN meeting’s closed doors. Flood Wall Street will come the day after the People’s Climate March, which is expected to bring out historic numbers. A People’s Climate Justice Summit is one of many activities planned as part of a week of action in New York. While a multitude of organizations, bringing a vast array of political visions, will participate in the week of actions, Flood Wall Street organizers say groups and people among them are seeking to push the conversation towards a critique of capitalism. Meanwhile, people across the world, from Mexico to Egypt to South Africa, plan simultaneous demonstrations and actions.

“The world is at stake,” said Vida James, a social worker and one of the many organizers behind Flood Wall Street, in an interview with Common Dreams. “This action is part of a larger global community that is taking direct action against climate change. We are part of a tapestry of communities all over the world fighting for change, risking arrest and security.”

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Take the Pledge (Click HERE)

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Pledge to #FloodWallStreet

Join the flood on September 22 starting at 9 am. The economy of the 1% is destroying the planet, flooding our homes, and wrecking our communities. After the People’s Climate March, wearing blue, we will bring the crisis to its cause with a mass sit-in at the heart of capital.

Yes! I will #FloodWallStreet

I will join the sea of bodies disrupting business as usual (and risk arrest).
I will support those participating in the sit-in.

LEAKED EMAIL FROM THE ADL REVEALS THEIR ATTEMPTS TO DESTROY ACADEMIC FREEDOM

In the ‘name of Democracy’, the following leaked email sent from the office of the ADL shows how they are attempting to defame Democracy itself ….

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'Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

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The leaked email … 

The ADL email is another indicator that there will be no let up this fall in Israel lobby efforts to use all repressive means available to stigmatize and punish, if not shut down altogether, campus criticism of Israel’s crimes.

It was sent by From: Brysk, Seth [mailto:SBrysk@adl.org] … you can write to him and tell him what you think.

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Dear …

We write to you today to provide information and recommendations about how to respond to conflicts that may arise on your campus due to the recent conflict in Gaza.

Over the last several years, we have seen individual students and student groups critical of Israel attempt to stifle dialogue about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict by disrupting events on campus and refusing to work with pro-Israel and Jewish student groups. In the wake of the recent crisis, anti-Israel organizations are placing increasing pressure on academic institutions to engage in a “Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions” (BDS) activities.

You should be aware that American Muslims for Palestine (AMP), the leading organization providing anti-Zionist training and education to students and Muslim community organizations around the country, recently issued a statement calling for an “International Day of Action on College Campuses” on September 23. AMP advocates for a variety of BDS-related initiatives – all in an effort to isolate and demonize Israel and Jewish communal organizations. These efforts serve only to polarize students on campus, inflame existing tensions, and often isolate and intimidate Jewish students.

AMP’s call for a “Day of Action” –scheduled for the evening before the Jewish holiday Rosh Hashanah– urges the elimination of study abroad programs in Israel, a ban on university administrators traveling to Israel, and scholars to refuse to participate in research or conferences with colleagues from Israeli institutions. Such tactics disrupt campus life and stifle the ideals of inquiry, free expression, and the civil exchange of ideas – – precisely the foundation on which university communities are built.

The Anti-Defamation League is a strong advocate of free speech and we do not seek to censor or stifle opinions in the university community. We have a long history of fighting for the ideals of individual expression and the free exchange of ideas, even when we disagree with the ideas being exchanged. However, no university should countenance attempts to discourage and suppress free speech, or harass and intimidate Jewish and other students. When this occurs, as in the examples noted above, appropriate action should be taken.

To address these concerns, we urge you to consider implementing the following policies and practices in the coming academic year:

  • Be aware of the discourse around the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that takes place on your campus and the potential for escalation.
  • Review student codes of conduct to ensure that activity which is detrimental to the free exchange of ideas is not allowed on campus.
  • When an event takes place on campus where there is potential for disruption, ensure that adequate security is provided to prevent any dangerous escalation in the disruption and ensure the safety of the speakers, organizers and attendees.
  • Send a senior university official to potentially hostile events and prior to the start of the event have him or her remind those in attendance of university codes of conduct regarding free speech and civil discourse.
  • Remember the school’s obligations under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, particularly the responsibility of the school not only to investigate an incident, but to take prompt and effective steps to eliminate any hostile environment and to take proactive steps to prevent its recurrence.
  • If the actions of the protestors violate any university policies or codes of conduct, appropriately discipline those involved.
  • Use your own right to free speech to condemn actions which go against the ideals of the university.
  • Reach out to individual students and organizations who may have been negatively affected by an incident.
  • Provide educational opportunities on campus that foster an environment of inclusion, acceptance and respect.

As one of the country’s premier civil rights organizations, ADL has decades of experience in helping administrators and students on campus respond to bigotry and intergroup strife. We would be happy to discuss the challenges many campuses face today and to assist your efforts to ensure that your campus remains a place where all viewpoints can be discussed in an atmosphere of respect and civility. We encourage you to be in touch with us if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Seth Brysk
Central Pacific Regional Director

Anti-Defamation League | 720 Market Street, Suite 800 | San Francisco, CA 94102 Phone: 415-981-3500 | Fax: 415-981-8933 | www.adl.org

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Full report HERE

NEW IRAQI VIDEO SHOWS HOW ISIS WAS ‘BORN’

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The video presented below was intended as satire ….. BUT, the symbolism is as real as it can get. ISIS was born out of a union of Satan (USA) and Israel …. but we already knew that ;)

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In a promo for the soon-to-come anti-ISIS show, broadcast several times daily on Al-Iraqiyya, we meet a Jewess adorned with a big Star of David necklace. “I hope to get a ring on my finger by someone who will destroy the country,” she says, then points to the red-clad devil, who says, “We will name our child ISIS.” The subtext here is a conspiracy theory, currently circulating in Iraq and elsewhere, that suggests Zionists created ISIS with the intention of ruining Islam.

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Full report HERE

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Also see THIS post

THE OTHER GITMO

The Palestinian Center for Human rights said Tuesday that its lawyers confirmed that at least four Palestinians who were arrested during Israel’s assault on Gaza were subjected to “torture” during their detention period.

Sounds like Gitmo to me …

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Palestinian prisoners in Israel's Mini Gitmo

Palestinian prisoners in Israel’s Mini Gitmo

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Gaza detainees underwent ‘torture’ in Israeli custody
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BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — The Palestinian Center for Human rights said Tuesday that its lawyers confirmed that at least four Palestinians who were arrested during Israel’s assault on Gaza were subjected to “torture” during their detention period.

PCHR lawyers visited four detainees in Ashkelon prison, and said they had undergone beatings or had been shackled between two chairs for long hours in a method known as “Shabeh,” a statement said.

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Israeli soldiers hold Palestinians in Gaza on July 24, 2014 (Maanimages/File)

Israeli soldiers hold Palestinians in Gaza on July 24, 2014
(Maanimages/File)

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It said Israeli forces detained dozens of Palestinian civilians during the seven-week Gaza offensive, 31 of whom were transferred to Israeli prisons.

Four of the imprisoned detainees were released while 26 remain in custody and are accused of being members of armed groups.

One of them was charged with being an “illegitimate combatant.”

According to international law, members of armed resistance groups are considered prisoners of war, and bills of indictment cannot be presented against them, the statement added.

The recently dissolved Ministry of Prisoner Affairs said in August that 200 Palestinians had been detained in Gaza while Israeli forces conducted a land invasion in Gaza, but that some of them had been released.

Crucial information was not immediately available about the prisoners, and the ministry accused Israeli authorities of withholding the prisoners’ names and whereabouts.

An Israeli army spokeswoman told Ma’an at the time that the prisoners were transferred to the Shin Bet intelligence agency for questioning.

On Sept. 9, a Palestinian died in an Israeli medical center died after allegedly being tortured in Israeli jails.

Issa Qaraqe, head of the department of prisoner affairs, said 35-year-old Raed al-Jabari had died after sustaining blows to the head, adding that an autopsy showed that internal bleeding and concussion were the cause of death.

An Israeli Prison Service spokeswoman said the man had hung himself in Eshel prison.

A LOOK INSIDE THE US IMMIGRATION DETENTION SYSTEM

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Ghost town detainees: inside the US immigration detention system

After a detention centre was built in one of Georgia’s poorest towns, the promised financial benefits never arrived. Instead thousands of immigrants are locked up, awaiting deportation

By Antony Loewenstein FOR

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The operators claim the facility isn’t run like a private prison. In reality it operates like one.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

‘The operators claim the facility isn’t run like a private prison. In reality it operates like one.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

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Stewart immigration detention centre is situated on the outskirts of Lumpkin, Georgia, a ghost town seven days a week. Visitors and detainees arriving at the centre – capacity: 2,000, all male – are greeted by a huge painted sign on a water tank: “CCA: America’s Leader in Partnership Corrections.”

I toured the centre, with the exception of the isolation ward, when I visited Georgia in August. Five men followed me everywhere: one from the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the centre operator, and the rest from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). It felt like overkill. They looked nervous the entire time, worried about my questions, worried something unexpected could happen and worried that I’d see something that would embarrass them. Down a long hallway, lit brightly with neon lights and smelling of paint and detergent, lines of inmates walked past me – some smiling, some waving and some looking forlorn.

Since October last year, ICE has removed more than 100,000 people from the US.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

‘Since October last year, ICE has removed more than 100,000 people from the US.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

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Despite the White House this year describing the surge of immigrants as an “urgent situation”, and privatised detention centres opening across America, Barack Obama continues to postpone his long-awaited immigration reforms, leaving many feeling betrayed. Since October last year, ICE has removed more than 100,000 people from the US. They are mostly Guatemalans, Hondurans and El Salvadorans who were in the US unlawfully – the three countries comprise roughly 29% of ICE removals federally. Just this year 70,000 children will arrive alone on America’s border, fleeing poverty and the US-led drug war in Central America.

The average inmate stay at Stewart is only 38 days, far less than most prisons. It’s virtually impossible for the detainees to establish any sense of permanence. It’s positive that long-term detention is largely avoided, unlike in detention centres in Britain, Greece and Australia, but inmates are often moved from one facility to another while others with deep roots in America are deported back to their country of origin without transparency. They are numbers to be processed.

Many inmates live in large, barred pods, with a maximum occupancy of 62. Others live in smaller rooms or the segregation unit. I spotted a few female CCA staff inside the pods with the male inmates. A sign next to one of the rooms read, “Upon Entering Detainee Pod All CCA Female Staff Will Announce Female in POD.”

Another pod had its lights dimmed because the inmates started working in the kitchen at 5am and were resting. CCA pays US$4 per day for inmates to perform kitchen duties, and less for other jobs (barbers receive $2, for example). ICE was proud to tell me that the law only mandates the state paying $1 per day, so CCA is doing a fine job.

‘Keep Detention Safe: ICE has zero tolerance for sexual abuse and assault.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

‘Keep Detention Safe: ICE has zero tolerance for sexual abuse and assault.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

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Men in a different, brightly lit pod were laying on their bunk beds under blankets and sheets. A microwave, cable TV, sink, Playstation and Wii were inside. One man was wearing headphones to listen to the TV in front of him. Basins and toilets were behind a curtain. Metal tables and seats were fixed to the floor. “I’m not saying it’s like the Hilton here”, an ICE manager said. Signs in English and Spanish read, “Keep Detention Safe: ICE has zero tolerance for sexual abuse and assault”.

A notice listed a phone number for inmates to call if they needed assistance. Telephones are available for inmates to call lawyers, embassies and friends, but the cost is exorbitant because of price gouging from companies making a fortune selling phone cards to inmates. It’s ahugely profitable business, just one of many markets to be exploited inside America’s incarceration system.

The library was stocked with countless Bibles and romance novels. Detainees played soccer and basketball, both inside and outside under the bright, blue sky. They have two hours daily to enjoy the outdoors. In the medical centre I saw an inmate in an orange jumpsuit and orange Crocs shoes hooked up to a drip. The medical offer refused to tell me about his condition. I wondered if it’s sickness or something worse; a few months before my arrival detainees went on hunger strike after complaints about rotten food. As soon as I see him we’re moved on.

I then passed a guard staring into a darkened cell. He was looking through a small window at an inmate sitting, looking straight ahead, with eyes wide open. He wasn’t handcuffed, but sat perfectly still in a flame retardant suicide smock, like a straitjacket. What exactly could he use to light himself when locked in a cell on his own, with the guard watching him like a hawk? The medical officer said that suicide watch wasn’t always necessary, but with the high rate of removals from Stewart a detainee’s state of mind was often fragile.

Another door led to the centre’s own court, where claims by immigrants who wish to remain in the country were assessed. The courts are under the executive, not the judicial branch of government, and serious questions exist over their lack of accountability. Many decisions aren’t even written down, hearings are secretive and access to lawyers is difficult. Almost every immigrant brought before the court is issued a deportation order.

Unlike America’s prison population, where drug and alcohol use and abuse are common, ICE told me that these problems don’t exist at Stewart. Throughout the visit I never saw any abuse, violence or racism. It was the ideal tour. My hosts were friendly and attentive, and dismissed the numerous inmate claims. One detainee I spoke to told me of racist taunting and abuse by guards, and boredom. He had heard about maggots in the food from a fellow detainee but hadn’t seen it himself. His own story was troubling, a migrant from Guyana in the 1970s facing deportation to a nation he hadn’t seen in 40 years.

Although both CCA and ICE claim the facility isn’t run like a private prison, in reality it operates like one. But according to Silky Shah, co-director of Detention Watch Network, CCA and other operating companies have only so much power. “They don’t have complete control,” she says. “Decisions are being made by politicians.” She is campaigning against a Congress-mandated quota that dictates 34,000 immigrants must be imprisoned in ICE centres nightly; CCA is effective at lobbying to ensure ongoing contracts.

A report released recently by some of America’s leading advocacy organisations found that ICE arrests in Georgia increased by “at least 953%” between the 2007 and 2013 financial years. Georgia’s rate of imprisoning immigrants was directly related to the colour of their skin: over that same period of time, only 1.6% of those detained by ICE were of “fair or light complexion”.

Huge numbers of families have also been separated, including individuals who had been living in Georgia since at least 2003. On the day I arrived at Stewart, 1,766 detainees were behind bars, the vast majority from El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico and Guatemala, with 60 other countries represented.

Shah’s organisation believes that “private interests should not be involved” in the detention business. But privatised incarceration is only one profitable area of commerce. She worries that companies selling ankle monitoring and surveillance will benefit if Obama even moderately reduces the number of people in detention.

“We believe in abolishing all detention centres in US”, Shah says. “At the moment, the burden is on the detainee to prove why they should stay but the burden should be on the government to justify expulsion. They should assess if the immigrant has community support.”

‘CCA’s strong financial performance never arrived in Lumpkin.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

‘CCA’s strong financial performance never arrived in Lumpkin.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

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Out in Lumpkin, the streets were deserted. The shops on Main Street were mostly empty, paint fraying on the window panes. A taxidermy outlet was one of the few open businesses. The town, in one of America’s poorest counties, is all but unknown to most Americans. Its population barely breaks 1,000.

I met a man in his 20s, either high or drunk, who was hanging out at a petrol station with his friends. He had a tattoo on his bare chest: “Me Against The World.” He told me he’s been living in Miami. “It’s so much better there,” he said. He was only there for a short visit.

The town’s dwindling youth population are leaving for greener pastures in bigger cities nearby. CCA started building Stewart in 2004, and sold the idea to ICE and the local community years later as both an economic benefit for local residents and a deterrent in a state traditionally hostile to immigrants.

Although the company’s 2014 financial results were strong, the benefits never arrived in Lumpkin. Many staff members don’t live in the town, but commute from more viable cities. Lumpkin reminds me of crumbling towns next to other detention facilities I’ve seen in Australia, Britain and Greece. The same failed promises from the same centre companies and state authorities were made in those nations too. The economic promise of a local detention centre is usually a lie.

Even in the detention centre itself CCA’s own employees struggle financially. I met one guard who was selling potato crisps, bottled water and chocolates to raise money from staff to support struggling CCA employees around the country. Although it’s admirable that people want to help, it’s revealing that the company doesn’t raise wages, but instead facilitates the sale of junk food.

In tough circumstances this kind of charity is often all people have. In Lumpkin, a small, Christian-run volunteer group, El Refugio, supports the visitors and families of detainees coming to the town. They operate a house over weekends very close to Stewart detention centre and offer free meals, accommodation, clothes and shoes – and comfort.

When I pay a visit one Saturday, a few days before my official tour inside Stewart, people from Atlanta and Columbus are providing a compassionate ear to an inmate. The conversation goes on for around an hour, with some hearing horrific stories. One man, Greg, tells me that “many Americans think anyone who enters America ‘illegally’ should be deported but we want to show a different side of people.” One of the group’s founders, Katie Beno Valencia, says El Refugio remains committed to shutting down any facility that makes money from misery.

This kind of humanity is sorely missing from America’s immigration debate, defined by toxic rhetoric from many Republicans and timidity from Democrats. Adelina Nicholls, executive director of Georgia Latino Alliance For Human Rights, doesn’t believe America wants to solve its immigration issues. “US people often care more about hunger in Ethiopia then poor Guatemalans here”, she told me at her office on the outskirts of Atlanta.

‘The economic promise of a local detention centre is usually a lie.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

‘The economic promise of a local detention centre is usually a lie.’ Photograph: Antony Loewenstein

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As a key representative of the large Latino community in Georgia, Nicholls sees the effect immigration detention has on individuals and families. “Stewart detention centre hurts us deeply and many detainees inside have been in the US for years,” she says. “They ask, ‘Why are gringos doing this to us?’ These workers have been employed for years in farms and restaurants and anger is growing. We are trying to mobilise resistance and civil disobedience.”

Her organisation receives at least 600 calls a month on its hotline, mostly Latinos asking for help. “It’s hard getting effective pro-bono lawyers here”, she tells me. “There are overly high bails for our clients … it’s a racist mindset [in Georgia]. It’s white supremacy with its concerns over brown people. It’s more profitable to behave this way.”

I saw just how profitable the industry can be when I visited the American Correctional Association conference in Salt Lake City in August. The five-day event brings America’s prison industry, wardens, county officials and lobbyists under one roof. As America shifts slowly but noticeably away from mass incarceration towards privatised probation, half-way houses and surveillance, new markets emerge. CCA’s CEO, Damon Hininger, has noted that his company is “well-positioned for growth opportunities”.

At Salt Lake City everything is on show: surveillance devices, Swat team uniforms, weapons, plastic e-cigarettes for inmates, drug-testing kits and prisoner-made furniture. Green prison designers and service contractors offer their services to public officials eager to spend tax dollars.

These are people who look at America’s prison and immigration system and see dollar signs. One night at an outdoor rooftop party I spoke to a man who works at GTL, a provider of communication and technology to prisons. The company’s website describes itself as a “corrections innovation leader”. He said he loves his job because he embraces new technology and revels in the chance to promote it.

“This industry hasn’t changed for over 100 years because of men who didn’t see any need to do so”, he said. “But new technology is forcing these shifts and my generation is at the forefront of it.”

A STORM OF DISSENT HAS TAKEN ISRAEL BY SURPRISE

The refusal of 43 men and women to continue their reserve duty in Israel’s elite 8200 intelligence-gathering unit has taken Israel by storm.

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Meet the ‘Good Kids’ Who Refuse To Spy for Israel

By Elisheva Goldberg FOR

Thinkstock

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The refusal of 43 men and women to continue their reserve duty in Israel’s elite 8200 intelligence-gathering unit has taken Israel by storm. The group published a letter on Friday, and it made its way quickly into the Israeli, American, and international headlines. The letter stated that these soldiers and officers are no longer willing to serve in their capacities as occupiers. In their words: “We refuse to take part in actions against Palestinians and refuse to serve as tools in deepening the military control over the Occupied Territories… We cannot continue to serve this system in good conscience, denying the rights of millions of people.”

The response in Israel has been deafening. Members of Knesset who are also former members of the 8200 unit have spoken out. Likud MK and Coalition Leader Yariv Levin announced that “those who refuse to help defend our country cross the line between supporting the Israeli democracy and the freedom it represents to supporting Palestinian terror…” Labor MK and Opposition Leader Isaac Herzog rebuked the letter-writers and emphasized that there were other ways to generate discussion. Not long after it was published, 150 members of Unit 8200 wrote a response letter, calling the move a “cynical use of politics in their legal and moral duty to serve in the reserve unit.”

The question everyone is asking now is — is it? Is this explosive letter a mere political stunt designed to aim more antagonism at a 47-year occupation? Or is it, as the signatories claim, something deeper — an attempt to take responsibility for the unnecessary invasion of privacy of a people who have no civil or legal recourse. It’s hard to tell, and, as with most sticky moral issues, likely a bit of both.

When I sat down with three of the original 43 signatories — a philosophy student, a technology and communications employee, and a computer science doctoral candidate — my first impression was one of earnestness: these were the “good kids.” As an Israeli 18-year-old, you don’t get into Unit 8200 by being a slacker. You get in by doing well in school and by showing flexible thinking, confidence and the ability to work well with others. The hope is that these qualities, plus training, will give these young people enough dexterity and thoughtfulness that they can be trusted with the secrets of Israel’s deep state. Unit 8200 graduates go on to found and power Israel’s innovative start-ups, and these three were likely to be no exception.

The first thing R, G and Y told me was that there were rules that I would need to abide by: first, that the army required I not use their full first names, second, that they wouldn’t be able to tell me much beyond the Information Security-approved testimonies they had already sent me, and that they’d have to check on whether or not I was allowed publish these rules (they did, and it was fine). Then, after explaining the rules, they stuck to them.

I asked questions — “what were some of the extortionist tactics you used against Palestinians?” and “You mention in one of the testimonies that there was a particular instance that ‘shocked’ you, can you expand?” and “What does intelligence gathering look like around Palestinian citizens of Israel?” — but their answer was often a shy and sheepish “we can’t answer that.”

What was clear is that they were not there to expose 8200, the IDF, or the State of Israel as the bad guy — they were there to expose the occupation as the bad guy. R made this point to me: “We’re not deluding ourselves — intelligence is a dirty business, we know that. The point is that in this specific instance, we’re holding millions of people under military rule that isn’t necessary. It’s a [policy of] choice… We, on a moral level, are refusing to take part in that.”

Here, some context is necessary: Unit 8200 is the army’s signal intelligence gatherer and interpreter. It’s a spying operation. Unit 8200, in its original manifestation, was responsible for gathering only external intelligence. This was helpful defense information about enemy countries, and it was clearly distinct from the internal intelligence agency, the Shin Bet. This division of powers existed to protect Israeli citizens who were, by law, entitled to privacy. However, when the Oslo process began in the 1990s, 8200 began gathering intelligence on Palestinians — after all, they were about to become a sovereign entity, a potentially enemy state.

Two decades later, the Palestinians remain stateless non-citizens, and Unit 8200 is still gathering (sometimes very personal) information about them. One motivator behind the letter was that “there is no procedure in place to determine whether the violation of the individual’s rights is necessarily justifiable.” And there can’t be. To paraphrase Dr. Hillel Ben Sasson, a Research Fellow and Program Manager at Molad: The Center for the Renewal of Israel Democracy (full disclosure: Hillel was a colleague at Molad and is a friend):

This is a gray area, and this gray area is not only dangerous but it also puts IDF soldiers in situations that they are not meant to be in. The Letter of Refusal that was published this weekend is another symptom of Israel’s stale political status quo. The country’s leadership needs to decide: Annex the territories and transfer the intelligence authority to the Shin Bet, or generate a two-state solution and have the intelligence authority rest with the Army. Until then, the soldiers of 8200 who deal with the Palestinians are no different from soldiers who stand at a checkpoint — both have been sent by a feeble leadership to engage in activities they were never meant to engage in. As long as these young people remain trapped like this, it is only a matter of time until the next refusal [to serve]…

Refusal — “insubordination” — and particularly this elite refusal, is not something Israelis take lightly, nor should they. Barak Ravid, Haaretz’s diplomatic correspondent and a Unit 8200 alum, went on Army Radio yesterday morning to explain his strong opposition to the letter. One of the reasons he gave for why this letter troubled him was because “none of them [the signatories] had the guts to be the Snowden of Israel.” In other words, instead of going after a very specific problem like Snowden — say, Unit 8200’s raw data sharing program with the United States — they went after the far more general “occupation,” which, Ravid said, is “a part” of Israel. “If the problem is really the occupation,” he said, “then your taxes are also a problem — they fund the soldier at the checkpoint, the education system… and 8200 is a great spin.”

Both Ben Sasson and Ravid are right. Both point out that the occupation has put Israel in an incredibly tight spot, both morally and technically.

Even if refusal is unconscionable to the vast majority of Israelis — for reasons of security, social configurations, or integrity — this refusal will not be forgotten quickly. These Unit 8200 reservists have generated a tremor that is being felt under our feet, if not heard above ground. Americans who refused to serve in Vietnam were few at first, but their numbers quickly swelled, and a fringe movement morphed into a force that could not be ignored. Israel is nowhere near that yet, but if some of the “good kids” are already saying no, Israel’s fissures are only likely to deepen further in the days and wars ahead.

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Related From The New York Times

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The Letter …

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Prime Minister, Mr Benjamin Netanyahu

Chief of General Staff, Benny Gantz

Military Intelligence Director, Major General Aviv Kochavi

Commander of Unit 8200

We, veterans of Unit 8200, reserve soldiers both past and present, declare that we refuse to take part in actions against Palestinians and refuse to continue serving as tools in deepening the military control over the Occupied Territories.

It is commonly thought that the service in military intelligence is free of moral dilemmas and solely contributes to the reduction of violence and harm to innocent people. However, our military service has taught us that intelligence is an integral part of Israel‘s military occupation over the territories. The Palestinian population under military rule is completely exposed to espionage and surveillance by Israeli intelligence. While there are severe limitations on the surveillance of Israeli citizens, the Palestinians are not afforded this protection. There’s no distinction between Palestinians who are, and are not, involved in violence. Information that is collected and stored harms innocent people. It is used for political persecution and to create divisions within Palestinian society by recruiting collaborators and driving parts of Palestinian society against itself. In many cases, intelligence prevents defendants from receiving a fair trial in military courts, as the evidence against them is not revealed. Intelligence allows for the continued control over millions of people through thorough and intrusive supervision and invasion of most areas of life. This does not allow for people to lead normal lives, and fuels more violence further distancing us from the end of the conflict.

Millions of Palestinians have been living under Israeli military rule for over 47 years. This regime denies the basic rights and expropriates extensive tracts of land for Jewish settlements subject to separate and different legal systems, jurisdiction and law enforcement. This reality is not an inevitable result of the state’s efforts to protect itself but rather the result of choice. Settlement expansion has nothing to do with national security. The same goes for restrictions on construction and development, economic exploitation of the West Bank, collective punishment of inhabitants of the Gaza Strip, and the actual route of the separation barrier.

In light of all this, we have concluded that as individuals who served in Unit 8200, we must take responsibility for our part in this situation and it is our moral duty to act. We cannot continue to serve this system in good conscience, denying the rights of millions of people. Therefore, those among us who are reservists, refuse to take part in the state’s actions against Palestinians. We call for all soldiers serving in the Intelligence Corps, present and future, along with all the citizens of Israel, to speak out against these injustices and to take action to bring them to an end. We believe that Israel’s future depends on it.

Senior Academic Officer Or

First Sergeant Ori

Sergeant Ella

Sergeant ***

Sergeant First Class Amitai

Captain Assaf

Lieutenant Assaf

First Sergeant Ariel

First Sergeant Guy

Sergeant First Class Galia

Lieutenant Gilad

First Sergeant Doron

Captain D

Professional Academic Officer H

First Sergeant T

First Sergeant Tal

Sergeant First Class Yair

First Sergeant Yoav

First Sergeant Yuval

Lieutenant Yonatan

Sergeant First Class Lior

Sergeant Liron

Sergeant Maya

Sergeant Michal

First Sergeant Menahem

First Sergeant Nadav

Sergeant Noa

First Sergeant Sa’ar

First Sergeant Eden

Sergeant Idan

Professional Academic Officer Amir

First Sergeant Amit

Sergeant K

Sergeant Keren

Sergeant First Class Regev

First Sergeant Roi

Sergeant R

First Sergeant Rotem

First Sergeant Shira

Major Shmulik

First Sergeant Schraga

Sergeant Sheri

Senior Academic Officer Tomer

LATEST ISIS SPOOFS

Obama redrawing the map of the Middle East

'Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

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Oil is what funds ISIS

"Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

WHY DID THE WEST CREATE ISIS WHEN THEY ALREADY HAD ZIONISM?

Even Jon Stewart can’t take the ISIS ‘threat’ seriously …. why should we? More and more people are waking up to the fact of who the real enemy really is.

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ISIS: ‘American-Zionist Tool’ for Dismembering Iraq (Sotal Iraq, Iraq)

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 If America had been truly serious about putting Iraq on the right path and instituting a genuine democracy, it would have issued legislation to protect human dignity and the right of the people to live within a framework of liberty, peace, security and safety! Instead, the United States did just the opposite, disrupting Iraq’s civilizational project.

“Strangely enough, America today is fighting ISIS, and has sent experts to Iraq for that very purpose. For whom? For the love of Iraqis? And for whose benefit does America support ISIS and provide it with weapons in Syria? For whose benefit does it support the al-Nusra Front? … Today it is essential for us to stand against, pay careful attention to, and analyze carefully, all American and Israeli plans. We must all join to defeat their criminal designs for undermining Iraq, and their tool of implementation, ISIS.”

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Globe & Mail, Canada

Globe & Mail, Canada

*

By Ali Abed Al Ghazzi 

Translated By Lina Barakat-Masroujeh

*

No observer of events can justifiably describe America’s role in the Middle East as one of a neutral advocate of liberty and peace, because the U.S. shows no concern for Arabs or Islamic interests. It is entirely concerned with securing its hegemony over the entire region to ensure the protection of its own economic interests and the security interests of Israel.

Following the 2003 occupation of this ancient society, which has well-established roots and stretches far back in history, America employed a reckless and cunning policy of spreading sectarianism in order to dismember and dissociate Iraq’s social and intellectual fabric.

The United States knew how to sow its malicious ideas with the rules and regulations imposed by the notorious [U.S. Proconsul] L. Paul Bremer. Bremer dissolved the Army, and his de-Baathification allowed militias to integrate into the armed forces, which fostered sectarianism and religious, ethnic and racial strife, establishing a system that encouraged the division of Iraq. Ultimately, that was the key objective.

If America had been truly serious about putting Iraq on the right path and instituting a genuine democracy, it would have issued legislation to protect human dignity and the right of the people to live within a framework of liberty, peace, security and safety! Instead, the United States did just the opposite, disrupting Iraq’s civilizational project.

Strangely enough, America today is fighting ISIS, and has sent experts to Iraq for that very purpose. For whom? For the love of Iraqis? And for whose benefit does America support ISIS and provide it with weapons in Syria? For whose benefit does it support the al-Nusra Front?

Everyone should be aware that America, with its policies of double standards, its purely demagogic methods, and its changing of colors in the region, are in place only to serve its own special interests. What does America and its Zionist and Freemason allies want from Iraq after the catastrophes of Mosul and Tikrit? [ISIS overran both cities and continues to occupy them].

Today it is essential for us to stand against, pay careful attention to, and analyze carefully, all American and Israeli plans. We must all join to defeat their criminal designs for undermining Iraq, and their tool of implementation, ISIS. And we much take special care not to exclude any of Iraq’s religions, ethnicities, or races. Iraq is in dire need of a nation that stands with our armed forces to deter these traitors and ISIS scum.

For the sake of protecting Iraq’s land, sky, and water, and maintaining the cohesion of the nation, remember that Allah never forsakes those who believe in Him, and that defending the homeland is a sacred duty in all religions.

 

Original report in Arabic HERE

 

Source

ZIONISM Vs ACADEMIC FREEDOM

The likes of Alan Dershowitz might be retired, but his legacy of hate lives on ….

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"Copyleft' by Carlos Latuff

“Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

*

Zionist group publishes target list of “anti-Israel” US professors

A display at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign protests the firing of Steven Salaita and limits on academic freedom. (Ali Abunimah)

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The Amcha Initiative, the Zionist organization that has repeatedly intimidated, spied on and harassed students and faculty, appears to be escalating its campaign by publishingwhat amounts to a target list of “anti-Israel” professors.

Amcha says that the list is made up of “218 professors identifying themselves as Middle East scholars, who recently called for the academic boycott of Israel in a petition.”

It links to an item at Jadaliyya titled “Over 100 Middle East Studies Scholars and Librarians Call for the Boycott of Israeli Academic Institutions.”

“Students who wish to become better educated on the Middle East without subjecting themselves to anti-Israel bias, or possibly even antisemitic rhetoric, may want to check which faculty members from their university are signatories before registering,” Amcha says.

It urges people to “Share this list with your family, friends, and associates via email, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, or word-of-mouth.”

“Thank you for your actions to protect Jewish students!,” Amcha’s posting concludes.

In the wake of the University of Illinois’ firing of American Indian Studies professorSteven Salaita over his opinions critical of Israel, Amcha’s move can be seen as a renewed effort at intimidation.

Amcha states that it is “troubling” that “many of these patently biased boycotters of Israel are affiliated with government-designated, taxpayer-funded National Resource Centers (NRC) on their campuses.”

It alleges that those pledging to boycott Israeli institutions complicit in Israeli crimes against Palestinians “have violated both the letter and spirit of the federal law which funds their teaching and research.”

Anti-Palestinian groups have previously tried to use the presence of public funding as a pretext to try to suppress free speech and academic freedom.

In one such effort tied to Amcha, a pro-Israel group tried repeatedly to persuade the State of California and other government bodies to prosecute California mathematics professor David Klein for supposedly “misusing” state resources by using his university-hosted personal website to criticize Israel and call for boycott.

Amcha’s claim that disseminating a list of professors calling for Israel to be held accountable can somehow “protect Jewish students” is based on the anti-Semitic stereotype that Israel represents all Jews and that all Jews identify with Israel or are collectively responsible for its actions.

This is exactly this kind of bogus association that lay behind the University of Illinois officials’ justifications for their firing of Salaita.

What is Amcha?

Amcha was founded by Tammi Rossman-Benjamin, a Hebrew lecturer at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Rossman-Benjamin is a notorious anti-Palestinian and anti-Muslim activist with a history of litigious threats against students and faculty.

An exclusive investigation by The Electronic Intifada earlier this year revealed that Amcha had infiltrated a student trip to Palestine in 2012, confirming long-held activist suspicions that anti-Palestinian political groups are spying on student activists.

An attorney told The Electronic Intifada that such surveillance could be in violation of several laws.

Rossman-Benjamin herself has been caught on video making virulently racist statements against students involved in Palestine solidarity activism on campus.

But despite protests by students, the University of California has taken no action in response to Rossman-Benjamin’s activities.

This type of complicity by university administrations has sadly been the norm and undoubtedly emboldens groups like Amcha to escalate their attacks on academic freedom and those who practice it.

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The ‘Targets’

Universities marked with an asterisk (*) receive federal funding to support programs in Middle East or Near East studies

Bard College
Dina A. Ramadan, Assistant Professor of Arabic

Boston University
Irene L. Gendzier, Professor Emeritus, Political Science

Brown University
Bashir Abu-Manneh, Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature
Ariella Azoulay, Professor, Comparative Literature
Beshara Doumani, Joukowsky Family Professor of Modern Middle East History

Bryn Mawr College
Peter Magee, Professor, Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology

California Institute of Integral Studies
Sahar Driver, Anthropology and Social Change

California State University Sacramento
Ayad Al-Qazzaz, Professor of Sociology

California State University San Bernadino
Jamal Nassar, Dean, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Central Michigan University
John Robertson, Professor of History

Clark University
Anita Fabos, Associate Professor, Department of International Development, Community, and Environment

College of New Jersey
Miriam Lowi, Professor, Departmet of Political Science

* Columbia University
Nadia Abu El-Haj, Professor of Anthropology
Lila Abu-Lughod, Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science
Gil Andijar, Professor, Departments of Religion and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS)
Hamid Dabashi, Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature
Wael B. Hallaq, Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities
Rhoda Kanaaneh, Adjunct Associate Professor, Middle East Institute
Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies and Professor of History
Mahmood Mamdani, Professor, Department of Middle East, South Asian and African Studies
Brinkley Messick, Professor of Anthropology
Timothy Mitchell, Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies
George Saliba, Professor of Arabic and Islamic Science Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures

College of the Holy Cross
Sahar Bazzaz, Associate Professor, Department of History

College of William and Mary
Mumtaz Ahmad, Professor of Political Science, Distinguished Visiting Scholar
Stephen Sheehi, Sultan Qaboos bin Said Chair of Middle East Studies

Colorado School of Mines
Hussein Amery, Associate Professor, Division of Liberal Arts and Intl. Studies

CUNY Graduate Center
Anthony Alessandrini, Associate Professor
Talal Asad, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology
Marilyn Hacker, Professor
Samira Haj, Professor of History
Christa Salamandra, Associate Professor of Anthropology

Dartmouth College
Lara Harb, Assistant Professor
Christopher MacEvitt, Associate Professor of Religion

Denison College
Isis Nusair, Associate Professor of International Studies and Women’s Studies

* Duke University
Miriam Cooke, Braxton Craven Professor of Arab Cultures
Frances S. Hasso, Associate Professor in Women’s Studies and Sociology
Engseng Ho, Professor, Department of Anthropology
Abdeslam Maghraoui, Associate Professor of Practice, Political Science

Evergreen State College
Sarah Eltantawi, Assistant Professor

Farleigh Dickenson University
Riad Nasser, Professor

Florida International University
Cheryl Rubenberg, Retired Professor, Political Science

Fordham University
Aseel Sawalha, Associate Professor, Anthropology

Frostburg State University
Haiyun Ma, Assistant Professor, Department of History

George Mason University
Bassam Haddad, Associate Professor, Department of Public and International Affairs

* Georgetown University
Osama Abi-Mershed, Associate Professor, Department of History, Director, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies
Fida Adely, Associate Professor, School of Foreign Service
Halim Barakat, Retired Professor
Jonathan Brown, Associate Professor, School of Foreign Service
Elliott Colla, Associate Professor, Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies
Rochelle Davis, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Susan Douglass, Education Outreach Director, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies
John L. Esposito, University Professor & Founding Director, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding
Yvonne Haddad, Professor of History of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations
Michael C. Hudson, Professor Emeritus, Walsh School of Foreign Service
Laurie King, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Lama Abu Odeh, Law Professor
Judith E. Tucker, Professor of History

* George Washington University
Mona Atia, Associate Professor of Geography and International Affairs
Ilana Feldman, Associate Professor, Anthropology, History, and International Affairs
Dina Rizk Khoury, Professor of History
Shira Robinson, Associate Professor of Middle Eastern History

Georgia Tech
Laura Bier, Associate Professor of History

Gettysburg College
Karen Pinto, Assistant Professor
Janet M. Powers, Professor Emerita

Hampshire College
Omar Dahi, Associate Professor of Economics

* Harvard University
Ousmane Kane, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society, Harvard Divinity School
Roger Owen, A.J. Meyer Emeritus Professor of Middle East History

Hunter College (CUNY)
Alexander Elinson, Associate Professor of Arabic Language and Literature, Department of Classical and Oriental Studies
Christopher Stone, Associate Professor

Illinois State University
Issam Nassar, Professor of Middle East History

Indiana State University
Glenn Perry, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Christine Baker, Assistant Professor

James Madison University
Manal A. Jamal , Associate Professor of Political Science

John Hopkins University
Todd Shepard, Associate Professor, History

Long Island University
Harriet Malinowitz, Professor of English

Loyola Marymount University
Najwa al-Qattan, Associate Professor

Marquette University
Louise Cainkar, Associate Professor of Sociology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sharon C. Smith, Program Head, Agha Khan Documentation Center

Michigan State University
Salah Hassan, Associate Professor

Montana State University Bozeman
Joan Hoff, Research History Professor

Montclair State University
Fawzia Afzal-Khan, Professor and Director, Women and Gender Studies

Morgan State University
Mary Ann Fay, Associate Professor of History

New School for Social Research
Ann Laura Stoler, Willy Brandt Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Historical Studies

* New York University
Bassam Abed, Clinical Professor of Social Science, McGhee Division
Sinan Antoon, Associate Professor
Tamer El-Leithy, Assistant Professor of History, Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
Finbarr Barry Flood, Professor of Art History
Michael Gilsenan, David B. Kriser Professor in the Humanities
Arang Keshavarzian, Associate Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies
Josefina Saldaña, Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis
Ella Shohat, Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies; Professor, Art and Public Policy, Tisch School of the Arts
Helga Tawil-Souri, Associate Professor

North Carolina State University
Anne Clement, Assistant Professor of History & International Studies

Northeastern University
Ilham Khuri-Makdisi, Associate Professor of History

Northern Arizona University
Yaseen Noorani, Associate Professor, School of Middle East and North African Studies
Scott Reese, Professor of History

Northern Illinois University
Tomis Kapitan, Professor (Emeritus), Philosophy Department

Northwestern University
Katherine Hoffman, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Uri Horesh, Assistant Professor of Instruction, Middle East and North African Studies
Jessica Winegar, Associate Professor, Anthropology

Ohio University
Louis-Georges Schwartz, Associate Professor

Pennsylvania State University – Altoona College
Beth Seymour, Instructor of Anthropology, Communications, History and Women’s Studies

* Princeton University
Richard Falk, Milbank Professor of International Law Emeritus
Molly Greene, Professor
Max Weiss, Associate Professor of History and Near Eastern Studies

Queens College – CUNY
Ammiel Alcalay, Professor, Classical, Middle Eastern & Asian Languages & Cultures
Ron Hayduk, Professor, Political Science

Rutgers University – New Brunswick
Toby Jones, Associate Professor
Yasmine Khayyat, Assistant Professor, African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Languages and Literatures
Elektra Kostopoulou, Lecturer
Jasbir Puar, Associate Professor
Samah Selim, Associate Professor, Department of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literatures

Sacramento City College
Riad Bahhur, Professor, Department of History

St. Lawrence University
John Collins, Professor of Global Studies

St. Mary’s College of Maryland
Betul Basaran, Associate Professor of Religious Studies

St. Olaf College
Linda Mokdad, Assistant Professor

San Francisco State University
Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies/Race and Resistance Studies
Dina Ibrahim, Associate Professor, Media and Communication

Scripps College
Lara Deeb, Professor of Anthropology

Simmons College
Elaine Hagopian, Professor Emerita of Sociology

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Steve Tamari, Associate Professor

Stanford University
Joel Beinin, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History and Professor of Middle East History

SUNY-Plattsburgh
Simona Sharoni, Professor

Swarthmore College
Farha Ghannam, Associate Professor, Anthropology

Syracuse University
Carol Fadda-Conrey, Associate Professor, Syracuse University
Amy Kallander, Associate Professor of Middle East History

Texas State University
Elizabeth Bishop, Associate Professor

Trinity College
Zayde Antrim, Associate Professor of History and International Studies
Vijay Prashad, Professor of International Studies

Tufts University
Kamran Rastegar, German, Russian and Asian Languages and Literatures

University of Arizona
Linda T. Darling, Professor of History

* University of California, Berkeley
Hatem Bazian, Lecturer, Near Eastern Studies and Ethnic Studies
Samera Esmeir, Associate Professor, Department of Rhetoric
Gretchen Head, Visiting Assistant Professor
Charles Hirschkind, Associate Professor, Anthropology
Saba Mahmood, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
Laurence Michalak, Emeritus Vice Chair, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Smadar Lavie, Scholar in Residence, Beatrice Bain Research Group
Minoo Moallem, Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies
Stefania Pandolfo, Professor, Department of Anthropology

University of California, Davis
Omnia El Shakry, Associate Professor, Department of History
Sunaina Maira, Professor
Suad Joseph, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Women’s Studies
Noha Radwan, Associate Professor of Arabic and Comparative Literature

University of California, Hastings College of the Law
George Bisharat, Professor

University of California, Irvine
Mark LeVine, Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History

* University of California, Los Angeles
Khaled Abou El Fadl, Distinguished Professor of Islamic Law
Nouri Gana, Professor
Sondra Hale, Research Professor/Professor Emerita, Departments of Anthropology and Gender Studies
Gabriel Piterberg, Professor of Middle East History
Aamir Mufti, Associate Professor
Susan Slyomovics, Professor Anthropology

University of California, Riverside
Sherine Hafez, Associate Professor, Women’s Studies and Middle East & Islamic Studies
Jeffrey Sacks, Associate Professor

University of California, San Diego
Michael Provence, Associate Professor of History

University of California, San Francisco
Claudia Chaufan, Associate Professor, Health Policy and Sociology

University of California, Santa Barbara
Nancy Gallagher, Research Professor, Department of History
Adam Sabra, Professor of History and King Abdul Aziz Ibn Saud Chair in Islamic Studies
Sherene Seikaly, Assistant Professor, History

University of California, Santa Cruz
Jennifer Derr, Assistant Professor, Department of History
Camilo Gomez-Rivas, Assistant Professor

* University of Chicago
Fred M. Donner, Professor of Near Eastern History, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
Lisa Wedeen, Mary R. Morton Professor of Political Science and the College

University of Colorado, Boulder
John Willis, Associate Professor

University of Connecticut
James C. Faris, Professor Emeritus, Anthropology; Director Emeritus, Program in Middle East Languages and Area Studies

University of Dayton
Ellen Fleischmann, Professor, Department of History

University of Delaware
Muqtedar Khan, Associate Professor

University of Hartford
Robert Lang, Professor of Cinema

University of Hawai’i at Manoa
Ibrahim Aoude, Professor
Farideh Farhi, Lecturer and Affiliate Graduate Faculty of Political Science

University of Illinois at Chicago
Nadine Naber, Associate Professor

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne
Asef Bayat, Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies and Professor of Sociology and Middle Eastern Studies
Wail S. Hassan, Professor of Comparative Literature and English
Linda Herrera, Associate Professor
Susan Koshy, Associate Professor
Faranak Miraftab, Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning

University of Iowa
Yasmine Ramadan, Assistant Professor of Arabic

University of Louisville
Julie Peteet, Professor of Anthropology

University of Maryland
Charles Butterworth, Emeritus Professor

University of Mary Washington
Farhang Rouhani, Associate Professor
Ranjit Singh, Associate Professor

University of Massachusetts – Amherst
Laura Doyle, Professor of English

University of Massachusetts – Boston
Leila Farsakh, Associate Professor of Political Science

University of Miami
Christina Civantos, Associate Professor

* University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Evelyn Alsultany, Associate Professor, American Culture
Kathryn Babayan, Associate Professor of History, Director of the Center of Armenian Studies
Rima Hassouneh, Lecturer II, Near Eastern Studies
Khaled Mattawa, Associate Professor, Department of English
Anton Shammas, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies and Comparative Literature
Ronald Grigor Suny, Charles Tilly Collegiate Professor of Social and Political History

* University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Cemil Aydin, Associate Professor of History
Juliane Hammer, Associate Professor, Religious Studies Department
Sarah Shields, Professor
Nadia Yaqub, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Asian Studies

University of North Texas
Nada Shabout, Professor of Art History

* University of Pennsylvania
Anne Norton, Professor of Political Science

University of Pittsburgh
Mohammed Bamyeh, Professor of Sociology

University of Richmond
Sheila Carapico, Professor of Political Science and International Studies

University of Southern California
Sarah Gualtieri, Associate Professor of History and American Studies

* University of Texas at Austin
Kamran Asdar Ali, Associate Professor, Anthropology
Barbara Harlow, Louann and Larry Temple Centennial Professor of English Literature

Univesity of the Pacific
Ahmed Kanna, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, School of International Studies

University of Wasington-Bothell
Karam Dana, Assistant Professor

* University of Washington – Seattle
Arzoo Osanloo, Associate Professor, Law, Societies, and Justice
Chandan Reddy, Associate Professor

University of Wisconsin – Madison
Samer Alatout, Associate Professor, Department of Community & Environmental Sociology

Virginia Commonwealth University
Faedah Totah, Associate Professor, Political Science Department

Wake Forest University
Michaelle Browers, Associate Professor of Politics and International Affairs
Charles Wilkins, Associate Professor, History Department

Wayne State University
Barbara Aswad, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, and Past President of the Middle East Studies Association of North America
May Seikaly, Associate Professor of Modern Middle East History

Wellesley College
Lamia Balafrej, Assistant Professor, Art Department
Lidwien Kapteijns, Professor of History
Sima Shakhsari, Assistant Professor

West Chester University
Lawrence Davidson, Professor of History, Department of History

Whitman College
Elyse Semerdjian, Associate Professor of History

* Yale University
Zareena Grewal, Assistant Professor of American Studies and Religious Studies, Faculty at Council on Middle East Studies
Dimitri Gutas, Professor of Arabic

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