‘CELEBRATING’ THE NEW YEAR OF TREES IN ISRAEL

TREES ARE HOLY OBJECTS IN ISRAEL … UNLESS …

.... they are owned by Palestinians

…. they are owned by Palestinians

Tu B’Shvat was celebrated a week ago in Israel.

This holiday has its origins not in the Bible, but rather in the Mishna, which was written in the early 3rd century CE. It is primarily an agricultural holiday, as evinced by its other name, New Year of Trees.

This holiday is celebrated in the midst of the rainy season (late January or early February). It was originally a holiday with halakhic (Jewish legal) significance, as it was used to mark the age of a tree for the purpose of harvesting and tithing its fruit – tithes that were given to the priests who served in the Temple and did not own any land.

After the Jewish people were scattered in the Diaspora and were no longer involved primarily in agriculture, Tu B’Shvat became a holiday symbolizing the connection between the Jewish people and the Land of Israel. It is not a holy rest day and businesses are open as usual.

Planting saplings – This is a custom that developed relatively recently – in the late 19th century, with the renewal of Jewish settlement in the Land of Israel. The initiative to plant trees began in the schools and spread throughout the country and became a deeply rooted custom. Today it is customary to take children on tree-planting outings on Tu B’Shvat. Preschools and schools hold special ceremonies to mark the holiday. In the past few years, an ecological element has been added to this holiday: the conservation and nurturing of trees (and the green landscape in general) as a symbol of the importance of nature in our lives.

(From)

For Palestinians, the tree is also a holy object, especially the olive tree … Attacks on olive trees are a key way that Palestinians are forced out of their homes and their lands confiscated for settlement construction, as the loss of a year’s crop can signal destitution for many.

The olive industry supports the livelihoods of roughly 80,000 families in the occupied West Bank.

Here is how the settlers ‘celebrated’ Tu B’Shvat on the stolen lands …

Settlers destroy 70 olive trees near Hebron
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(MaanImages/File)
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HEBRON (Ma’an) — Settlers cut down over 70 Palestinian olive trees in the Hebron district on Monday, locals said.Witnesses told Ma’an that the settlers destroyed over 70 tree saplings near the town of Sair.

The trees had been planted a week ago in an area threatened with annexation near the illegal settlement of Metzad, located in the Gush Etzion bloc west of Bethlehem.

Locals have organized a campaign to replant the trees.

Attacks on olive trees are a key way that Palestinians are forced out of their homes and their lands confiscated for settlement construction, as the loss of a year’s crop can signal destitution for many.

The olive industry supports the livelihoods of roughly 80,000 families in the occupied West Bank.

Since 1967, approximately 800,000 olive trees have been uprooted in the occupied West Bank, according to a joint report by the Palestinian Authority and the Applied Research Institute Jerusalem.

4 Comments

  1. sedwith said,

    February 10, 2015 at 08:17

    The usual one rule for us and one for you. When you see the old Palestinian man beside settler felled olive groves where some trees were more than 100years old…..what can I say? thanks for posting.

  2. shaggerleybax said,

    February 10, 2015 at 18:11

    Only in Israel do people try and change AD and BC in BCE and CE.Why?

  3. Imagine said,

    February 11, 2015 at 01:22

    “Only in Israel do people try and change AD and BC in BCE and CE.Why?”

    Because they are not sophisticated. They are “common”

  4. lolathecur said,

    February 11, 2015 at 13:32

    Reblogged this on Lolathecur's Blog.


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