REMOVAL OF CONFEDERATE STATUES IS NOT A WHITEWASH OF HISTORY

Columbia University Prof. Eric Foner says Confederate statues only celebrate one side of Southern history — and taking them down does not amount to a whitewash of history as President Trump has suggested.

Statue of Robert E. Lee being removed from Lee Circle in New Orleans this May. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Eric Foner: Confederate Statues Celebrate Only One Side Of History

In a New York Times op-ed, the noted scholar of American history addresses the tweet by Trump that removing Confederate statues tears apart “the history and culture of our great country.”

Foner, who is Jewish, notes that most Confederate statues were erected during times of rampant racism and white supremacist fever like the 1890s, which followed the end of Reconstruction and the 1920s, which was the height of a Ku Klux Klan revival.

To bolster his claim, Foner points out the absence of statues to commemorate James Longstreet, one of General Robert E. Lee’s key lieutenants who later endorsed black male suffrage and fought white supremacists.

 Ultimately, there is a clearly racist rationale and context for the construction of these statues, he says:

 

1 Comment

  1. desertspeaks said,

    August 23, 2017 at 02:30

    In August 2017, in the wake of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, Foner argued that Confederate monuments should not be removed, but instead more statues should be installed, including statues of African Americans like Nat Turner.


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