WHY IS ISRAEL (AND YOUTUBE) SO AFRAID OF THIS BOY?

First, you must read this post from yesterday …

ISRAELI TERROR GONE VIRAL THEN REMOVED FROM YOUTUBE …

 

Mohammed Tamimi, 11 years old, rests his head on his mother's lap at their home in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah, on August 29, 2015. (AFP/Abbas Momani)

Mohammed Tamimi, 11 years old, rests his head on his mother’s lap at their home in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah, on August 29, 2015. (AFP/Abbas Momani)

Video of Israeli soldier arresting boy is latest in war of perception

NABI SALEH (AFP) — A soldier pins a boy down and is assaulted by his family: The scene might have gone unnoticed if not for footage that has turned it into another weapon in the Israel-Palestinian war of perception.

Palestinians see it as proof of Israel’s abuses in the occupied West Bank, while many Israelis say the soldier fell into a media trap laid by activists.

The incident played out on Friday in the Palestinian village of Nabi Saleh and footage of it has since gone viral, generating a bitter debate both online and off.

As is often the case when it comes to the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, there has been little room for middle ground.

The video and pictures, including those taken by AFP, show a masked Israeli soldier trying to arrest an 11-year-old boy who has a cast on his left arm.

According to the Israeli military, the boy was suspected of having thrown stones during a protest.

As the soldier holds him against a rock, his automatic rifle at his side, members of the boy’s family, including his mother and sister, along with other activists rush over and try to pull him off the child.

A wrestling match ensues, with the soldier’s ski mask pulled off and the boy’s sister biting the soldier on the hand. The soldier yells for help, and eventually a superior officer arrives and orders him to let the boy go.

While walking away, visibly frustrated, the soldier throws down a stun grenade.

The images quickly made the rounds.

Palestinian papers reproduced a cartoon showing the soldier with a dog’s head, while some in Israel saw the decision not to arrest the boy as a sign of weakness.

Left-leaning Israeli newspaper Haaretz, referring to the headlock the soldier had put the boy in, lamented the situation in which the military has found itself in the West Bank.

“It’s a national headlock in which an entire army, and behind it a nation, remains in a state of denial that there are military solutions to the conflict,” it said.

An Israeli soldier pins down 11-year-old Mohammed Tamimi following a march on August 28, 2015 in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah. (AFP/Abbas Momani)

An Israeli soldier pins down 11-year-old Mohammed Tamimi following a march on August 28, 2015 in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah. (AFP/Abbas Momani)

‘I wasn’t afraid’

Nabi Saleh, near Ramallah, has for years been a flashpoint in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Each Friday, Palestinians, foreigners and even Israelis protest against the expansion of the nearby Halamish settlement. Stones are typically thrown by the protesters, while tear gas and rubber bullets are fired by Israeli forces.In the past three years, two people have died and 375 been injured, with nearly half of them minors, according to protesters.

According to his father, the child in the video, Mohammed Tamimi, broke his wrist while fleeing an Israeli tank in his village, which was why he was wearing a cast.

“I wasn’t afraid,” the boy told AFP, “but I cried to call my family to come get me away from the soldier.”His mother Nariman said she thought “only one thing: free my son from the soldier’s hands.”

The Tamimi family has been at the forefront of the protests in Nabi Saleh. The father, Bassem, said he has been arrested nine times.

Ahed, the boy’s teenage sister wearing a Tweety Bird shirt in the video, is known to some for older photos showing her raising her fist at Israeli soldiers. It resulted in her being received by then Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in 2012.

Some Israelis have accused the family of being agitators who put their children in danger.

An Israeli officer familiar with the situation called Friday’s protest a “PR stunt” where demonstrators “try to provoke soldiers by hurling stones at them that can be deadly,” forcing them to react.

Arnon, the soldier’s father, told Israeli journalists that he regretted that his son’s restraint was not being given more praise.

The Haaretz analysis however sought to put the episode into context.

“No amount of PR and media management will make the occupation of another nation look good,” it said.

UK BEX ALERT ~~ BRITISH MEDIA NOMINATES PALESTINIAN ACTIVISTS FOR ACADEMY AWARD

Not quite, but they might as well have ….

Original ‘Nomination’ came from UK Media Watch, Her Majesty’s zionist police dog

Here

and HERE

Mainstream-media

Daily Mail and Telegraph change headlines critical of Israel after claims arise Palestinian family photographed clashing with IDF soldier are known provocateurs and that incident was staged.

The incident in question ….

Members of the Tamimi family struggle with IDF soldier (Photo: AFP)

Members of the Tamimi family struggle with IDF soldier (Photo: AFP)

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Ahed Tamini, also known as 'Shirley Temper,' biting the IDF soldier (Photo: Reuters)

Ahed Tamini, also known as ‘Shirley Temper,’ biting the IDF soldier (Photo: Reuters)

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IDF soldier has Muhammad Tamini in headlock (Photo: Reuters)

IDF soldier has Muhammad Tamini in headlock (Photo: Reuters)

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More in my Previous Post

UK papers tone down ‘anti-Israel’ coverage of Nebi Salah clashes

LONDON – Two of Britain’s leading newspapers have changed their coverage of a violent clash between an IDF soldier and Palestinian women and children after claims arose that the family involved in the incident, and particularly a blonde girl photographed biting the soldier, are known provocateurs.

On Friday, an IDF soldier trying to arrest a stone-throwing 13-year-old Palestinian boy drew international outrage after he was documented in a violent clash with Palestinian women and children.

Members of the Tamimi family, prominent Palestinian activists, physically attacked the soldier in an attempt to free son Muhammad Tamini, whose hand was in a cast.

According to the UK Media Watch, a pro-Israel website monitoring coverage of Israel in the British press, the girl who appears in the photos biting the soldier is Ahed Tamini, the daughter of Narimen and Bassem Tamini, who is known among Israeli supporters online as “Shirley Temper.”

The blonde-haired girl became a symbol of the Palestinian resistance in international media and is often documented in confrontations with Israeli soldiers. Muhammad Tamini is her brother.

The website quoted Tamar Sternthal from CAMERA (Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America) who said that the Palestinian village of Nebi Salah, where the incident occurred, is “where photographers gather every Friday to document repetitious scenes of Palestinian residents and international activists clashing with Israeli soldiers.” The site noted this was where “activists often place their children in danger to score propaganda points.”

The UK Media Watch said major newspapers like The Daily Mail and The Telegraph realized the incident was staged by the Palestinians in order to cause provocation.

The Daily Mail’s original headline read: “Extraordinary moment that desperate Palestinian women fought and BIT an Israeli soldier after he put boy with a broken arm in a headlock at gunpoint.”

Later, however, the story was edited and given a different headline: “Questions raised over shocking West Bank image of boy with a broken arm being held at gunpoint by an Israeli soldier after girl, 13, seen biting attacker is revealed as prolific ‘Pallywood star.'”

According to UK Media Watch, “the term ‘Pallywood’ refers to the staging of scenes by Palestinian journalists in order to present the Palestinians as hapless victims of Israeli aggression.”

The British Telegraph initially ran the story with the headline “Palestinian women wrestle Israeli soldier off injured small boy.”

Later, however, the story was removed entirely from the Telegraph’s website.

Leading British newspapers The Times of London and The Guardian did not cover the story at all, while the UK Media Watch said Channel 4 News, The Independent and the Daily Mirror – a tabloid – reported it “and largely followed the Pallywood script (the latter going with the headline ‘West Bank Freedom Biter’).”

Source

BRAVE PALESTINIAN WOMEN STAND UP TO THE OCCUPATION

This video shows several women preventing an Israeli soldier from abducting a Palestinian child in the village of Nabi Saleh in the occupied West Bank on Friday.

The footage, shot by Bilal Tamimi, shows a masked soldier assaulting a child whose arm is in a cast.

Palestinians intervene to prevent the abduction of a Palestinian boy by an Israeli soldier during a protest against Israeli colonization in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh, 28 August. (Shadi Hatem APA images)

Palestinians intervene to prevent the abduction of a Palestinian boy by an Israeli soldier during a protest against Israeli colonization in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh, 28 August. (Shadi Hatem APA images)

Full Report by Ali Abunimah HERE

Palestinian women rescue child from attack by Israeli soldier

 

Also see THIS post from Mondoweiss

Videos: Brave Tamimi women of Nabi Saleh take down Israeli soldier assaulting injured child

 

And MY post from yesterday

RECENT VIDEOS ~~ A GLIMPSE AT WHAT IS HAPPENING IN PALESTINE TODAY

CHILD ABUSE ~~ WHAT THE UN REFUSES TO SEE

Israeli Military Torturing Palestinian Children ~viewer discretion~

Palestinian children’s rights group says ‘ill-treatment is still widespread, systematic and institutionalized’ in IDF detention system; IDF source denies allegations.

Israel cages Palestinian children in outdoor during freezing weather By Latuff

Israel cages Palestinian children outdoors during freezing weather
By Latuff

NGO accuses Israel of systematic abuse of Palestinian kids

A West Bank-based children’s rights group on Wednesday accused Israeli security forces of widespread abuse of Palestinian minors in the West Bank.

The IDF swiftly denied the allegations, outlined in a report by a group called Military Court Watch (MCW).

The study estimates that since Israel seized the West Bank from Jordan in the 1967 Six-Day War, “up to 95,000 children” have been detained by Israeli forces in the territory.

The report, submitted to the UN special rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, looks at 200 cases in which minors were detained since 2013.

In its conclusion, MCW found that in spite of recent developments in the military detention system, “ill-treatment is still widespread, systematic and institutionalized.”

Citing the testimonies, it said 187 of them had their hands bound during the first 24 hours of arrest, 165 said they were blindfolded and 124 complained of physical abuse.

“Aggressive behaviour, threats and violence are also sometimes utilized during the interrogation, including threats to beat, rape, hold in solitary confinement, electrocute or shoot the minor,” it said.

Only eight of the 200 said they were given access to a lawyer prior to interrogation and just seven had a parent present during questioning.

A source in the IDF Prosecutor’s Office told AFP there was no legal requirement for either a lawyer or a parent to attend questioning; not for Palestinians and not for Israeli suspects.

But a defendant facing trial was provided with legal counsel and the parents had the right to attend court hearings, the source told AFP, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Regarding allegations of threats and physical abuse, he said defendants or their parents were free to make complaints in open court but “almost never” did.

He said the entire interrogation process, conducted in Arabic, was videotaped and the recordings were made available to the defense.

In the report, a copy of which was seen by AFP, MCW said a “significant number of minors” had been arrested during the night in “terrifying military raids on their homes”.

Most children were arrested in areas close to Jewish settlements or to roads used by settlers, which are often a target for children throwing stones.

From

THIS post from last night is a must read

Israel doesn’t abuse children, it just murders them

By Khalid Amayreh

NON LETHAL MURDER

First, see THIS post from last week ….

Non-lethal ammunition used by the IDF

Non-lethal ammunition used by the IDF

Now, see the results …

A Palestinian child was critically injured after Israeli forces shot him with a rubber-coated steel bullet near the Shufat refugee camp on Thursday, witnesses said..

Palestinian boy, 10, critically injured by rubber bullet in Jerusalem

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A Palestinian child was critically injured after Israeli forces shot him with a rubber-coated steel bullet near the Shufat refugee camp on Thursday, witnesses said.

Yahiya Sami al-Amudi, 10, was walking near a checkpoint by the East Jerusalem refugee camp when he was shot by the bullet.

He was taken to the Hadassa hospital in Ein Karem with a fractured skull, jaw, and left ear and had surgery to remove his left eye.

Medics said he is in a critical condition.

A spokesman for Fatah in the camp, Thaer Fasfous, condemned the targeting of children with tear gas, stun grenades and rubber-coated bullets.

Israeli police spokesperson Micky Rosenfeld said that there were “disturbances” in the Shufat area after locals threw stones at municipality workers.

Israeli border police used “non-lethal” weapons and a 10-year-old boy was moderately injured and taken to hospital, he added.

333170C

Source

ISRAELI ARMY HAS PLANS TO KILL MORE HUMANELY

The military has considered using the non-lethal method in the West Bank that is already used by Israeli police, but doubts regarding its lethality prevented its use. 

Controversy over the issue arose after the death of 16-year-old Mohammed Sinokrot in East Jerusalem last year, whose relatives claimed he was struck by a police rubber bullet.

Non-lethal ammunition used by the IDF

Non-lethal ammunition used by the IDF

IDF to use ‘more humane’ non-lethal ammunition

After extensive testing, military approves use of rubber bullets in the West Bank by specially authorized units to disperse riots.

The IDF will soon introduce a new means for riot dispersal. Following a series of experiments recently performed by the military, the use of non-lethal ammunition has been approved as a method to avoid escalations of violence.

An Army officer told Ynet that the rubber bullet “is considered a more humane weapon”.

The military has considered using the non-lethal method in the West Bank that is already used by Israeli police, but doubts regarding its lethality prevented its use.

Controversy over the issue arose after the death of 16-year-old Mohammed Sinokrot in East Jerusalem last year, whose relatives claimed he was struck by a police rubber bullet.

The tens of thousands of rubber bullets purchased by the IDF are intended for use by the Judea and Samaria Division, and will be deployed in the upcoming weeks, initially as a pilot program for border guard units.

Another change in crowd control measures used by IDF is the Ruger firearm, which specially authorized units can use to fire small lead projectiles into the lower body of a central instigator.

The rubber bullets to be used by the IDF will have a diameter of 40 millimeters (about 1.5 inches). Like the Ruger, units will require special authorization to use them. The minimum distance from a demonstrator must be seven meters (about 23 feet), with a range of a few dozen meters.

Source

WHAT NETANYAHU’S ‘APLOLOGY’ MEANS TO THE CHILDREN OF PALESTINE ~~ IN VIDEOS

Netanyahu ‘apologised’ to the ‘Arabs’ in Israel for the racist remarks he made on Election Day.

He was worried that the ‘Arabs were voting in droves’ to unseat him. The following two videos might explain why they wanted him unseated … 

Where is the apology to these children?

This video was shot during a night raid on ten homes in the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. B’Tselem does not say who shot the video, but typically the videos it releases are made by Palestinians.

Children terrorized

Masked soldiers enter Palestinian homes in Hebron in dead of night, order residents to wake their children, and photograph the children.

Late at night on 23 Feb. 2015 Israeli troops entered 10 neighbouring apartments in Hebron. They demanded that the children be awakened, asked their names and photographed them. B’Tselem volunteers who live there filmed the incident. The military cannot treat civilians–and certainly not children–as potential criminals. Not only is this policy of entering Palestinian homes by night unjust and terrifying. It illustrates how casually and arbitrarily the lives of Palestinians under occupation are disrupted and their rights violated. B’Tselem calls on the military to discontinue this policy without delay.

 

Read Ali Abunimah’s full report HERE

LIFE BEFORE DEATH IN THE OCCUPIED WEST BANK

Don't just remember .... Help stop the madness!

Don’t just remember …. Help stop the madness!

“Here lies my brother”: Short video recalls life of murdered Palestinian teen

The night before he died, Muhammad and his father went up on the roof of their house. The teen pointed toward nearby Birzeit University and told his father that he wanted to study journalism there.

“Through media and journalism,” his father recalls Muhammad saying, “I can send a message to the world that there’s a people here that is carrying out legitimate resistance to the occupation and I can ask the world to help us end the occupation.”

Click HERE to see what you can do to stop the murders

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Click HERE to read Ali Abunimah’s full report on the situation

REMEMBERING THOSE THAT ISRAEL WANTS YOU TO FORGET ABOUT

Take action for Palestinian children killed by Israel

nmfl-2

Defence for Children International–Palestine (DCI-Palestine) has put together a stunning online resource to tell their stories and to encourage people to take action to help call for justice.

Click HERE to see the presentation ….. it’s a must watch.

Less accountability than ever

On 23 November, Israeli prosecutors brought manslaughter charges against the Border Police officer allegedly responsible for shooting Nadim Nuwara.

“The defendant used the blanks magazine so that his live fire, as opposed to rubber-bullet fire, would not be observed,” DCI-Palestine quotes the indictment as saying.

Some Israelis have rallied around the suspect, who has not been officially named, hailing him as a hero and inciting more killings of Palestinians.

No arrests have been made in the killing of Muhammad Abu al-Thahir, however.

And the fact that anyone was charged in Nuwara’s death – albeit for a reduced charge of manslaughter instead of murder – is rare enough.

Since 2000, Israeli forces have killed more than 8,896 Palestinians, DCI-Palestine states. At least 1,895 have been children.

In 2014, Israeli occupation forces killed ten children with live ammunition in the West Bank, including Nuwara and al-Thahir.

Between 2000 and 2013, just 5.2 percent of all investigations resulted in indictments.

And over the past three years, the chances of indictments have become slimmer – down to just 1.4 percent.

Take action

When you reach the end of the timeline on the No More Forgotten Lives website, DCI-Palestine asks you to take part in its Thunderclap – a social media campaign that is easy to join using Twitter or Facebook to draw attention to the killings.

This is a beautifully assembled resource to tell a story no one should ever have to tell.

The goal is to bring a measure of accountability and justice for these two boys, and for all the children whose lives have been stolen by the brutality of Israel’s occupation.

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The above was prepared by Ali Abunima 

ISRAELI STYLE PEACE PROCESS UNFOLDS ON THE STREETS OF JERUSALEM

The clashes and arrests across Jerusalem came after days of intense security across the city, where Israeli police have deployed heavily amid four months of tensions between local Palestinians and occupation authorities.

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'Peace or Peaces' by Latuff

‘Peace or Pieces’ by Latuff

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28 injured as clashes rage across Jerusalem overnight
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A Palestinian protestor throws a burning tire during clashes with Israeli
forces at the Qalandia checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem
on Oct. 31, 2014 (AFP Abbas Momani)
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JERUSALEM (Ma’an) — At least 28 Palestinians were injured as clashes with Israeli forces continued into the late hours of the night on Friday across Jerusalem, as anger over a series of killings by Israeli police boiled over into the streets of the city’s Palestinian neighborhoods.Clashes broke out in the occupied East Jerusalem neighborhoods of Silwan, al-Issawiya, al-Tur, and Wadi al-Joz, as hundreds marched and fought pitched battles with security forces in anger over the killing of Mutaz Hijazi, 32, early Thursday, as well as the killing of Abd al-Rahman al-Shaludi, 21, the week before.Both men were suspected by authorities of involvement in violent incidents targeting Israelis. But Palestinians have been outraged by their killings, highlighting that instead of being arrested both were shot dead by police on sight.

An autopsy on Friday revealed that Mutaz Hijazi, 32, was shot 20 times by different officers and left to die on his rooftop, as Israeli police refused to allow locals to reach him — and later forced an ambulance to surrender his body, before returning it to the family late Thursday.

On Friday evening, Israeli forces raided the area around Hijazi’s home al-Thawri neighborhood in Silwan, and locals told Ma’an that soldiers attacked a tent set up by the mourning family where friends and relatives were dropping in to offer condolences.

Israeli forces reportedly fired stun grenades, tear-gas canisters, and rubber-coated steel bullets at mourners gathered at the tent, and several men and women suffered severe tear gas inhalation while many others were injured by rubber-coated bullets.

Activist Jihad Oweida told Ma’an that one mourner, Attiya Shabbaneh, was injured by shrapnel from stun grenades in his face and was taken to al-Maqasid Hospital for treatment.

In the Bir Ayyub neighborhood, Israeli soldiers fired rubber-coated steel bullets and tear-gas canisters at more than 200 Palestinian youths who had gathered to visit the mourning tent set up in Hijazi’s home.

Many suffered from excessive tear-gas inhalation and one was injured and received a fracture in his foot. A Palestinian youth identified as Rami Salah was detained by Israeli forces.

An official responsible for ambulance and emergency services at the Palestinian Red Crescent, Amin Abu Ghazaleh, told Ma’an that 28 Palestinians suffered from light injuries, including from rubber-coated steel bullets injuries and tear-gas inhalation, while three were taken to hospitals after they were hit at close range with rubber-coated steel bullets in the head, legs, and stomach.

In the al-Issawiya neighborhood, meanwhile, dozens suffered from excessive tear gas inhalation after Israeli forces fired tear gas canisters heavily during clashes that erupted as Israeli forces detained an unidentified Palestinian.

Clashes also erupted in the Sur Baher village, Wadi al-Jouz neighborhood, and other neighborhoods in the Old City of Jerusalem.

An Israeli police spokesman did not immediately return a request for comment.

Old City security tight

Also on Friday, Israeli police released the director of the Wadi Hilweh Information Center, Jawad Siyam, along with Yazan Siyam, Muntaser Faraj and Mahmoud Gaith who were all detained Friday on charges of “assaulting” Israeli settlers in September.

It was unclear why the arrests had taken place more than a month after the alleged assault, but some have speculated that the arrests were related to the political nature of the work of the Wadi Hilweh Information Center, which focuses on resisting settler encroachment in the neighborhood of Silwan.

The four were released on the condition to pay a 500 shekels bill each, and were sentenced to house arrest until next Monday.

The clashes and arrests across Jerusalem came after days of intense security across the city, where Israeli police have deployed heavily amid four months of tensions between local Palestinians and occupation authorities.

Police, some in riot gear, guarded a series of checkpoints leading from the Old City’s outer gates all the way to the Al-Aqsa compound, an AFP correspondent said.

They checked identity papers of people passing between the barricades, both those on their way to pray and those who worked nearby.

Zuheir Dana, 67, said he was unable to get from his shop to his home.

“I wanted just to get home, which is about 50 meters (yards) away from the Al-Aqsa compound, but police didn’t let me through,” he said.

“It’s been bad every day here since Ramadan,” he added, referring to the Muslim holy month that fell in July.

Markets in the Old City, normally bustling on a Friday morning, were nearly deserted due to the security measures.

The security measures followed the unprecedented complete closure of the Al-Aqsa mosque compound — the third-holiest site in Islam — for the first time since 1967, which ignited protest across the Arab world and even from the United States.

Palestinian community officials say the wave of unrest gripping the city is fueled by a sense of hopelessness resulting from Israel’s policies in occupied East Jerusalem, which have left many young people with a sense that they have nothing to lose.

The arrests of hundreds over summer for participation in protests against Israel’s massive assault on Gaza — which left nearly 2,200 dead in the tiny coastal enclave — has only added fuel to the fire.

Although Palestinians in East Jerusalem live within territory Israel has unilaterally annexed, they lack citizenship rights and are instead classified only as “residents” whose permits can be revoked if they move away from the city for more than a few years.

They face discrimination in all aspects of life including housing, employment, and services, and are unable to access services in the West Bank due to the construction of Israel’s separation wall.

East Jerusalem is internationally recognized as Palestinian territory, but Israel occupied it in 1967 and later annexed it in a move never considered legitimate abroad.

 

PHOTO OF SUSPECTED PALESTINIAN TERRORIST

OMG! ….. Just the thought of meeting this guy in a dark alley is giving me goosebumps 😉

'Suspected 2 year old terrorist' (MaanImages)

‘Suspected 2 year old terrorist’ (MaanImages)

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Israeli soldiers attempt to

detain 2-year-old for rock-

throwing

JERUSALEM (Ma’an) — Israeli forces in occupied East Jerusalem on Friday attempted to detain two Palestinian children, a two-year-old and a nine-year old, on suspicion of throwing rocks.Israeli soldiers were conducting a raid on the home of the Jaber family in the Silwan neighborhood in order to search for an individual suspected of throwing rocks at them from the roof, the family told Ma’an.When the soldiers ascended to the roof to detain the alleged culprit, however, they found a two-year-old named Mimati Asaad Jaber who was playing with his mother. While they were playing, apparently, a rock had fallen into the street below.

The boy’s grandfather, who was in the house during the raid, said that the boy was only playing and that he did not know there were soldiers in the street below the building when he tossed the stone.

Upon seeing the two-year-old with his mother, however, the Israeli soldiers shifted their attention to a nine-year-old member of the family nearby.

Members of the Jaber family told Ma’an that once Israeli soldiers found out the nine-year-old boy’s name — Izz al-Din al-Qassam, also the name of a famous Palestinian national hero and used by Hamas as the name for its military brigades — they began questioning him.

The Israeli soldiers attempted to detain the nine-year-old boy based on the fact that he had “colored rocks” in his pockets, presumably to throw at soldiers, but when they searched the child they found that the “rocks” were in fact candy.

A new draft law being considered by Israeli lawmakers would lead to charges of up to 20 years, even if it could not be proven that rock-throwers intended to cause damage.

A 2011 report by Israeli rights group B’tselem, meanwhile, noted that around 100 percent of all Palestinian children accused of rock-throwing are convicted, largely because minors are kept in prison for the duration of any trial so the pressure to plea bargain is high.

Military Court Watch estimated that at the beginning of October more than 180 Palestinian children and youths were being held in Israeli prisons, down from 250 in June.

According to a 2013 report by the UN’s Children’s Fund, Israel is the only country in the world where children are systematically tried in military courts and subjected to “cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment.”

Over the past decade, Israeli forces have arrested, interrogated, and prosecuted around 7,000 children between 12 and 17, mostly boys, at a rate of “an average of two children each day,” UNICEF said.

 

WATCH HOW THE OCCUPATION TURNED AN AMERICAN TEEN INTO A PALESTINIAN ACTIVIST

Photo of Tariq provided by the Abukhdeir family

Photo of Tariq provided by the Abukhdeir family

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Until recently, Tariq Abu Khudair  was a ‘happy go lucky’ American teenager. Watch and listen to the following account as to how the brutality of the occupation changed his life…

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Transcript

Tariq Abukhdeir: Thank you for having me tonight. Good evening. I’m happy to be back in the US – safe – and when I went overseas I had a tough time.

And actually when I arrived in Palestine the Israelis kept me in the airport for ten hours. At that time I was confused so I thought about it a little bit. I thought about the conflict between Israel and Palestine. As we speak right now, the Palestinian people are suffering.

I visited Palestine for six weeks and what happened to me was just a small taste of what they go through every single day. And the Palestinians do not have rights and when I went over there I forgot that I had freedom. I wish, now that I’m back, that they have the same freedom I have. I appreciate freedom more now that I’m back in the US.

I’m just an average kid. I was born in Baltimore and I moved to Tampa when I was eleven. I’m fifteen and I’m in tenth grade right now – I started school already.

Now, about my cousin Muhammad Abu Khudair. He was my first friend that I made when I went to Palestine this year – because I hadn’t been to Palestine for eleven years. So right when I went there I saw him with all my cousins. We became friends on the spot. We went out every day – we had so much fun. We stayed up all night.

So one night during the month of Ramadan, I passed by him and I said “Hi” to him. I was on the way to the bakery to buy some food. I came by and I drove off and I came back and I saw the cops were exactly where he was sitting. And I asked – there was only one of my cousins that was there – and I asked him “What happened?”

He told me that they kidnapped Muhammad and that, right when he told me that, so many things went through my mind. I was thinking, is he going to come back alive, what are they going to do to him, is he saying anything, can anybody hear him?

So at that point I got a call, the same second that I was told that he was kidnapped – and it was my cousin and he said “What are you doing at 4:30 AM outside?”

And I’m like “Bro, Muhammad just got kidnapped.” So then all my cousins, all of Shuafat came down, and they were like, “Where is he? We need to know where he is right now.” And we were talking to the cops. And the cops asked me, “Were you the last person to see him?” And I said “Yes. All I saw – and he was just sitting there in front of his house and I drove off and I came back and I saw you guys.”

So later on, a couple of hours later, we found out that he was killed. I found out first and I didn’t want to tell anyone. I just sat by myself and my cousins were like, “Why are you sad? He’s going to be back. He’s going to come back. We have to be positive.”

And I’m telling them “I hope so. God’s will.” And I’m sitting there thinking to myself, “Is this true?” I don’t want to think about it in a bad way but did he really get stabbed and burned alive? Could that really happen? Could someone actually do that to another person? And I was scared for his life.

And then, he was stabbed and burned alive and finally everyone knew when they announced it in the mosque. And when they announced it in the mosque everyone just dropped. They were like, “Is it true? We don’t even know how someone could to that to someone else.”

And to even make it worse, they began to fire rubber-coated metal bullets at us, at everyone. They even were firing at my mother, at my aunts and uncles that were inside their houses. They were shooting at every house. And it was so sad and inhumane that they could do that when we lost someone in our family. We’re the ones – my mom is still grieving and my cousin’s mom, my aunt, is still grieving over her son’s death. When he was murdered we thought to ourselves that we tried our best to think he was going to come back, until we found out everything.

To make it worse, later that day, I was on the side of the street when there were some protestors in front of me and there were the IDF [Israeli army] firing rubber bullets at them. And that’s when I was on the side and I’m thinking to myself, “Is this really happening in front of me? Are they really firing rubber bullets to the whole city, to my family?

It made me think how could this happen right in front of me? And then I heard Israeli soldiers behind me, and then I’m thinking they’re going to run by me. They’re just going to shoot like the rest of the soldiers did. They began to run after me. That’s when I panicked. And everyone began to scream and panic too and then they ran. And I began to run too and I panicked because I didn’t know what to do. And that’s when they stuck to me. Three of them were running after me, one person.

And that’s when I jumped the fence on my left and I was at a dead end. It was not actually a dead end but there was like a little ten-foot drop in front of me which everyone jumped. I was going to jump it because I was scared and so many things were running through my mind. So when I was about to jump it, they tackled me and punched me and zip tied me. So I couldn’t make any movements.

I was zip-tied and leg-cuffed and beaten, punched and kicked in the face until I was unconscious. And even when I went unconscious they kept punching and kicking me like I was a punching bag. And I woke up blindfolded in jail. I woke up like I thought I was in the same place, I felt like I was in my cousin’s place, God rest his soul. I’m like, “Where am I? Are they going to kill me? Am I going to live through this?” And I’m bleeding down my neck, and I’m bleeding down every part of my body and I feel like my face is a bubble because of how much it hurt.

After being six hours in jail – they took me to jail – they finally took me to a doctor. And when I went to that doctor I went unconscious again and when I woke up I saw my dad and my uncle in front of me. They said “you might come back home with us tonight, or you might go to jail.”

I thought to myself “why would I go to jail? They beat me up!”

And later on I began to drink and eat and while I was drinking and eating the soldier came up to me to go get dressed. I’m going back to jail. And I’m like – I couldn’t say anything.

So I went to the bathroom and I changed back into my clothes, the same clothes – I was in a gown in the hospital. I had to change back into the same clothes that had all my blood on it, and my ripped shirt.

I went back to the jail and I saw all my cousins in jail and it was so sad. It’s inhumane like how you can just take a bunch of kids for no reason and beat them. I saw my one cousin sitting next to me and his whole shoulder is dislocated and his whole shoulder is bleeding. And I’m looking at myself like how, how is this happening to me? How’s it happening to all the Palestinians? How do they live through this?

I stayed in jail for four days. Actually on the second day I was in jail they said I went to a court date. I went to the court, sat in a jail cell inside the court. I didn’t even get to go to my court date. They just tortured us. They put us in a cell inside the court. Nine people in a closed cell and it was so small. We had to stand, we couldn’t sit down. For six hours we kept standing in that cell. We couldn’t do anything until one by one, [I] was called.

So that’s when I returned to jail. Two days later I had another court date. The same thing happened. I went to the jail cell, stayed there for a couple of hours and finally I got out and there was a bunch of media in front of me. I was getting a bunch of questions. Right when I walked into the courtroom I saw my parents. My face lit up. I was so happy. So many things running through my mind. I’m finally going home. I’m finally going home. I’ll think about everything when I’m going home.

Then the judge told me I’m going to be on house arrest. Usually when I think about house arrest I’m like, “house arrest, I don’t know what that is.” Until she told me that I’m not allowed to go back to my city where my parents are staying – you’re supposed to stay away from your family. Why should I stay away from my family? They’re like trying to torture me.

So they did all this with no charges. That’s what they do to all the Palestinian people – with no charges filed. So on the day I left Palestine they attacked all my cousins, the rest of them. They took half my cousins when I was there and then they took the rest when I left – the night I left.

They waited for me to leave and then they took my cousins, ransacked my house that I was staying in. They took my fifty-year-old uncle. He got back from work and they took him. He works every day from eleven in the morning to six in the morning the next day and they took him. He was so tired.

And I really want to thank everyone that supported me and it’s sad that my cousins are still being persecuted. And the three cousins that were arrested with me – their names are Karim, Muhammad and Mahmoud – they’re still in jail because they’re not American and they didn’t have a video that showed the brutality of the Israelis.

Now, I think all people should be treated equal, no matter who they are or where they come from. We were all created equal and we all deserve to have our rights and I feel my cousins should have the same rights that Israel gives the Israelis.

And giving Palestinians the same rights is a key to peace in the Middle East. I pray one day my cousins can feel safe to play outside and have fun. And I don’t want them to feel scared when they’re outside trying to play with their other cousins. It’s inhumane, I can’t explain it. It’s really sad. Thank you.

** Suha Abukhdeir**: Thank you. Good evening everyone. I want to thank the US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation for having us here tonight. We’re honored to be here. My name is Suha Abukhdeir. I’m the mother of Tariq Abukhdeir.

I cannot begin to describe the pain of seeing my beloved son held in an Israeli prison without charges, denied medical care and suffering from a brutal beating given to him by the Israeli police.

When I first heard about the vicious beating he faced at the hands of the Israeli police and saw his bloody and swollen face and his unconscious body in the hospital, I feared for his life and I didn’t know if he was going to survive.

I could not bear to watch the video of his beating. What if he was screaming for help and I could not be there for him? When I arrived at the hospital, when I found out about him being in jail and then taken to the hospital, I found an Israeli policeman at the hospital door.

And I asked him if I can go in and see my son. He refused at first. After my husband had pleaded with him he finally allowed me but proceeding to say, “You cannot get near him, you cannot touch him and you cannot speak to him.”

So I proceeded to go to the hospital room and I looked over and all I could see is this helpless body laying there – he had a distorted face. I did not recognize him. I didn’t know if he was alive, what had happened exactly. So I told my husband, “Please, don’t leave him” – because he was handcuffed to the hospital bed.

I felt like since he was handcuffed to the hospital bed that the same people that brought him to the hospital could take him right back. So I was afraid.

The next morning, we got a call from the American consul Josh Wagner and he told us that he had made an appointment for all of us to go see Tariq in jail. I found out before [consular official] Josh Wagner called that they took Tariq back to jail and I couldn’t believe it.

I knew he was on antibiotics so the first thought I had was “Are they really going to give him his antibiotics? Are they really going to take care of him? Are they going to feed him?”

And especially after seeing the condition he was in, I couldn’t bear to think he was in a jail cell when he should have stayed in the hospital. So the next morning we went with Josh Wagner to the jailhouse. So when we proceeded and told the Israeli police that Josh Wagner had an appointment to see Tariq today. They said no one was going to see any prisoners and that was it and they closed the prison doors in our face.

Josh Wagner could not believe it. He told them, “I am not going to leave here until I see him because I made an appointment with you guys and I’m going to stay until I see him.

He proceeded to call the US embassy and the Israeli embassy back and forth for three hours until finally they agreed to let him in alone. So he got in – before he got in I told him, “Please Josh, can you just let me know of his condition. Ask him, is he eating, are they giving him his medications because the medications are in Hebrew and obviously he can’t read Hebrew.” These are the same people that beat him that now are caring for him.

I’m grateful to be back in America safe with my son but I know Palestinians go through what my son faced every day. Tariq was not able to grieve his cousin’s death or attend his cousin Muhammad’s funeral as a result of the beating Israeli police had given him that same day his cousin was brutally murdered by the Israeli extremists.

Instead of the police protecting us they taunted us, telling us that Muhammad was just the first to be killed and that 300 Palestinians would be killed for the three teenagers who were killed.

My son and family have been very traumatized by this whole experience. Our cousins are still in jail and the only reason Tariq is out is because he is an American citizen and his beating was caught on tape.

While some of the Israeli officials tried to justify the vicious beating my son received by smearing his name, my son has never been charged with any crime. Nothing, nothing can justify restraining the hands of a fifteen-year-old child and beating him unconscious. Although as Americans we enjoy great freedom in America, in Jerusalem we felt worse than second-class citizens because the Israeli government treated us differently because we had a different religion and ethnicity.

Like my Palestinian cousins I felt that my family had no rights. My son was viciously attacked while in custody. He was in jail for four days. We were forced to pay a $1,000 bond and my son faced nine days of house arrest away from his family – although he committed no crime and faced no charges.

When we left to America, Israeli police raided the family home where we were staying and arrested the males there. They’re still being held today without any charges. The Israeli police involved in the beating of my son must be held accountable so that no other mother must go through the pain that I went through.

My son still suffers from body aches and pains and headaches, not to mention the emotional trauma he must now struggle through. I just pray that America and the world can have the same sympathy for the countless children who are wrongfully arrested or even killed by Israel who do not carry a US passport like my son Tariq.

None of this would have happened if the Israeli government valued the life of my son Tariq and other Palestinian Muslim and Christian children in the same way they value the lives of Israeli children. Thank you.

 

More HERE

IMAGINE HAVING A PRESIDENT THAT DOESN’T CARE ABOUT YOU

Unfortunately Palestine is not alone with that situation …

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Whose side are you on?

Whose side are you on?

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As Abbas busies himself with non existent Egyptian promises, the following has been going on in Palestine. Seems he has no interest in any of it. (Click on links to see reports)

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Jerusalem teen shot by Israeli soldier a week ago dies of his wounds

Ma/an Images

Ma/an Images

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Watch: Israeli soldiers arrest 2 young boys in Silwad

(MaanImages/File)

(MaanImages/File)

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Israeli forces shoot, kill Palestinian near Ramallah

Issa Khaled al-Qatri, 22, was killed by Israeli forces early Wednesday (MaanImages)

Issa Khaled al-Qatri, 22, was killed by Israeli forces early
Wednesday (MaanImages)

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Israeli forces detain, assault Palestinian near Bethlehem

(MaanImages/File)

(MaanImages/File)

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Israeli forces detain 6 Palestinians in West Bank overnight

(MaanImages/File)

(MaanImages/File)

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And the pièce de résistance

Abbas may end unity with Hamas over Gaza governance

A woman waves the national flag as she celebrates the agreement to form a unity government in Gaza on April 23, 2014. (AFP Mahmud Hams)

A woman waves the national flag as she celebrates the agreement
to form a unity government in Gaza on April 23, 2014.
(AFP Mahmud Hams)

ISRAELI SOLDIERS HAVE WAY TOO MUCH TIME ON THEIR HANDS …

hebron israeli soldiers

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President Roosevelt was known for his ‘make work projects‘, which helped put many unemployed Americans back to work during the Great Depression.

Today, it seems that a problem has developed in Israel; the Army has way too much time on their hands and ‘make work projects’ have been developed to occupy their time (AND PALESTINE).

Here are just a few of this week’s examples of zionist harassment and terrorism …

(Click on links to see full reports)

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Israeli demolitions leave 5 homeless in East Jerusalem

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Israeli forces detain 4 Palestinians at Aqsa compound sit-in

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Israeli forces detain 3 Palestinians from Beit Ummar

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Israel demolishes Palestinian structures in West Bank

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There are lots more examples of the harassment the Palestinians face every day of their lives … there might be a ceasefire, but we are still waiting for a

CEASE OCCUPATION!

ALL IN THE FAMILY ~~ ISRAELI VERSION

It wasn’t bad enough that Israeli terrorists brutally burnt to death a Palestinian teenager … Israeli soldiers beat his visiting American cousin shortly before the funeral.

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Tariq Khdeir was born in the U.S. and is an American citizen.

He is the cousin of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, 16, the East Jerusalem boy who was bundled into a car and later murdered.

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Video shows troops beating Tariq Khdeir as he lies prone on the ground.

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American Cousin of ‘Revenge’ Victim Beaten by Israeli Soldiers

Tampa Teenager Jailed — Police Claim He Resisted

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COURTESY OF WTSP
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The American cousin of suspected Palestinian revenge attack victim was beaten and imprisoned by Israeli troops during protests before the funeral of the Jerusalem teen, Arab-American activists charged.

Tariq Khdeir, 15, who is a tenth-grader in Tampa, Fla., suffered serious injuries in the July 3 beating and is being held under police guard at a hospital, according to the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a prominent advocacy group.

Activists demanded American officials intervene with Israel to win his release — and take action against the soldiers involved.

“It is the duty of American officials to intervene and secure the release of an American citizen who was so viciously attacked and denied medical treatment,” said CAIR-Florida Chief Executive Director Hassan Shibly in a press release.

His parents, Suha and Salah Khdeir, said their son was detained but had been treated at an Israeli hospital.

Israeli police spokeswoman Luba Samri said that Tariq Khdeir had resisted arrest and attacked officers, the Associated Press reported. He was detained with a slingshot in his possession used to hurl stones at police, Samri claimed.

Tariq Khdeir’s father, Salah, said he witnessed his son’s arrest and insisted the boy was not involved in the violence, the Associated Press reported.

Khdeir is a high school sophomore in Tampa, who was visiting his Palestinian relatives in Shuafat, Jerusalem, for the first time in over a decade when he was beaten and detained, Haaretz reported

The incident took place outside the home of his murdered cousin. He is being held under police guard at Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem.

He is due to be brought before a judge in Jerusalem on Sunday, Ma’an news agency reported.

Relatives of the Florida boy have identified him as being the boy depicted in a video that show Israeli soldiers holding down and beating someone.

Israeli newspapers have reported widespread allegations of brutality and misconduct by soldiers in recent days as clashes escalate.

Tariq Khdeir was born in the U.S. and is an American citizen.

He is the cousin of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, 16, the East Jerusalem boy who was bundled into a car and later murdered.

Palestinians believe that the slain teen was killed by right-wing Jews incensed over the earlier killings of three kidnapped Jewish teenagers. Authorities insist they do not yet know the motive, although sources say they suspect it was a revenge slay by Jewish extremists.

A State Department spokesperson demanded a speedy probe into the case and said a consular official visited the teen in an Israeli jail Saturday.

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A second Report from

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Beaten Florida Cousin Called ‘Fun-Loving’ All-American Teen

Tariq Khdeir Earned Trip to Jerusalem With Straight A’s

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COURTESY OF KHDEIR FAMILY
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By Dave Goldiner

The cousin of a Palestinian revenge attack victim who was beaten by Israeli troops is a fun-loving all-American high school student from Tampa, Fla., relatives said.

Tariq Khdeir, 15, earned a summer vacation to visit relatives in the Holy Land by scoring straight A’s in tenth grade — and was occupied with the soccer World Cup until his cousin was killed in a suspected revenge attack by Jewish extremists in Jerusalem.

Aunt Sana Khdeir said the family was stunned to see the boy beaten senseless by Israeli troops in widely circulated videos on social media.

“I’m all cried out of tears,” said Khdeir, 22, a student at South Florida University. “We haven’t slept since this happened.”

Tariq Khdeir, who played on his high school soccer team and joined the fishing club, had been with his cousin, Mohammed Khdeir, 16, just an hour before the Palestinian was bundled into a car and burnt alive.

Relatives say the Florida cousin was demonstrating with other relatives outside the family’s East Jerusalem home when Israeli soldiers charged at them and attacked the teen.

“He’s not used to this, not used to it all,” the aunt said. “The kids started running and he was caught.”

Videos show troops beating Tariq Khdeir as he lies prone on the ground.

The aunt said there is no doubt that the videos depict her nephew, who was wearing an Ekko shirt.

“We’re 100% sure it is him,” she said.

The boy suffered a broken jaw and nose in the beating and has been taken from a hospital to an Israeli jail, where he is being held pending a court date, she said.

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COURTESY OF KHDEIR FAMILY
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“He’s a good boy, he’s good in school, he loves soccer, loves music,” Salahedeen Khdeir, the boy’s father, told Palestinian journalists. “This is the first time he went to sleep far away from his home. And where does he end up? In a jail next to the people who hit him almost to death.”

Israeli authorities say Tariq Khdeir resisted arrest and was armed with a slingshot.

U.S. authorities demanded a speedy probe into the case and said a consular official visited the boy in jail Saturday.

A spokeswoman for U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor, who represents the Tampa district where the Khdeirs live, did not return a call for comment.

“We are so angry and frustrated,” said Sana Khdeir, 22. “Bloodshed on either side is wrong, whether Israeli or Palestinian.”

The family was already crushed by the news that Mohammed Khdeir was killed in a slaying that Palestinians believe was a revenge attack by Jewish extremists after the killings of three kidnapped Jewish students. The beating of his younger cousin only deepened their despair.

“The Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been going for 65 years,” Sana Khdeir. “I want peace, we all want peace. But we’re never going to come to peace when all we get is more occupation and bloodshed.”

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The US is ‘profoundly troubled’ by the incident …… let’s wait and see what they do about it …

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US ‘profoundly troubled’ by reports of police beating of US-Arab youth

Psaki: US ‘calling for speedy, transparent and credible investigation’, into alleged police beating of Tariq Khdeir.

Full Report HERE

 

‘BREAKING THE SILENCE’ GOING VIRAL INTERNATIONALLY

The following appeared in The Irish Times (including more recent video)

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Israeli soldiers speak out on abuse of Palestinians

Yehuda Shaul says disturbing images represent norm in occupied territories

By Kitty Holland

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Yehuda Shaul, a former Israeli soldier who served in the West Bank and Gaza, tells how he and fellow soldiers secured a television screen one night while out on patrol, to watch a World Cup match.

It was 2002 and Brazil were playing.

“The way we passed those night patrols was to bang on random houses, no reason and we’d go in, wake everyone up, men in one room, women in another, mess everything up, onto the next house.

“That night we wanted to watch the match so we were looking for a house that had a satellite dish. We found one, went in and locked the family in the basement while we watched the match. Why wouldn’t we? That’s what we do in the occupied territories.

“The most important message you get from your superiors in the Israeli military is that every Palestinian needs to feel Israel is at the back of their neck. So, quickly, you adapt to the environment; you don’t see the Palestinian in front of you as human. They are reduced to being an object.”

A photograph accompanies the story, of a young Israeli soldier grinning to the camera, in a Palestinian family’s living room, the aforementioned football match on their television in the background.

It is one of hundreds of chilling photographs taken by former members of the Israeli Defence Forces, of themselves and their colleagues engaging in what Shaul says becomes “normal” behaviour after being sent to the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza. A fraction – about 85 – will be exhibited by the Breaking the Silence project in Dublin from today.

Other photographs include one of a Palestinian man, blindfolded, his hands tied, his head bowed. A young Israeli soldier crouched down beside him beams to the camera in an image reminiscent of some that emanated from Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, in 2003.

Another shows a teenage boy, again hands tied, blindfolded and left sitting, while Israeli soldiers chat in the background. One of the most disturbing is one of children, who appear aged between about seven and 10, “playing soldiers”.

Some are clearly ‘playing’ Palestinians, their hands against a wall, their legs splayed while another ‘plays’ the occupying soldier, pointing a stick at them as a ‘gun’. An Israeli soldier looks on. “This [kind of] experience is normal to these young kids,” says Shaul “It’s their reality from a young age.”

‘People hadn’t a clue’

Breaking the Silence was initiated by Shaul 10 years ago, after he completed his tour of duty with the IDF in Hebron. All Israeli males must spend three years in the military and females two years, with some exceptions, after high school.

“When I came back, I began to question what I had done, what I had done to Palestinian people. Once I understood the reality of what I had done I found I couldn’t continue unless I did something. I started to talk to military colleagues and found they felt the same. The one thing we kept bumping into was that people hadn’t a clue.”

Israelis, he says, didn’t know – or didn’t want to know – the abuses he says are perpetrated every day in the occupied territories. “Soldiers come home, maybe for a weekend. It’s a different reality. They don’t talk about the reality of the military. What happens in the West Bank stays in the West Bank.”

He and colleagues began gathering photographs and testimonies and were soon exhibiting all over Israel, including in the parliament, the Knesset.

Their work created “noise”, he says and for a time they were one of the biggest stories in the country. It has opened a discussion and some awareness but he says most Israelis choose to say of the occupation: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

“What we have documented are not isolated incidents. This is a story of what happens when a nice kid from Jerusalem or Tel Aviv gets sent to the Territories. They adapt.”

Asked to comment, a spokesman for the Israeli embassy in Dublin said: “Breaking the Silence represents only an insignificant minority of IDF veterans (less than 1,000). It is not an objective human rights organisation. It is a political organisation devoted to tarnishing the reputation of the Israeli Defence Forces and, by extension, the Israeli state.

“Breaking the Silence are ‘useful idiots’ allowing themselves to be manipulated by the international boycott, divestment, sanctions campaign against Israel. It seeks to delegitimise and ultimately destroy the state of Israel as the national homeland of the Jewish people.” Breaking the Silence has exhibited in the US, Berlin, Madrid, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Brussels and continues to gather photographs and testimony from returning soldiers. It runs at the Gallery of Photography in Dublin’s Temple Bar from today until June 29th and is free. It is hosted by Trócaire.

 

DESPITE DENIALS, AUTOPSY PROVES THAT ISRAEL IS A MURDEROUS STATE

Initial report of the shootings can be read HERE

Report of Israel’s denial can be read HERE

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The funeral of one of the victims …

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The killing of Nadim Nuwara, who was 15 at the time of his death, has been a source of controversy, as Palestinian medical sources and eyewitnesses have said that Israeli soldiers shot him while Israeli security sources have disputed the claim, despite the existence of a video footage showing the incident from a number of angles. 

The autopsy — which was performed by a team of specialists led by the head of the institute, Saber al-Aloul, with the presence of Danish, Portuguese, American, and two Israeli doctors — concluded that the Palestinian youth was killed by Israeli forces.

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Autopsy concludes Nakba Day victim killed by Israeli bullets
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A vigil held in Ramallah on May 17 after the death of Nadim Nuwara.
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BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — An autopsy ordered on the body of a Palestinian teenager killed during Nakba Day demonstrations last month concluded that his death was caused by an Israeli bullet, a source close to the matter told Ma’an.The killing of Nadim Nuwara, who was 15 at the time of his death, has been a source of controversy, as Palestinian medical sources and eyewitnesses have said that Israeli soldiers shot him while Israeli security sources have disputed the claim, despite the existence of a video footage showing the incident from a number of angles.Nuwara’s body was exhumed on Wednesday and an autopsy was performed at the Palestinian Institute of Forensic Medicine, the source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said.The autopsy — which was performed by a team of specialists led by the head of the institute, Saber al-Aloul, with the presence of Danish, Portuguese, American, and two Israeli doctors — concluded that the Palestinian youth was killed by Israeli forces.

The source added that the exhumed body was in a good condition and had not decomposed yet, so doctors had no difficulties in locating the places where the bullet entered and exited the body, and even found fragments of it remaining in the body.

Samples of the bullet fragments and the body was taken for testing in order to prepare a report that will be published in the coming days.

Nadim Nuwara was killed alongside Muhammad Audah Abu al-Thahir, 17, as they participated in protests to mark the 66th anniversary of the “Nakba” or “catastrophe” when Zionist militias expelled 750,000 Palestinians from their homes in what became Israel in 1948.

The protests took place near the Ofer Detention Center near Ramallah and became part of an international controversy over Israel’s army’s regular use of excessive force against Palestinian protesters.

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Additional REPORT from Human Rights Watch

 

PALESTINIAN TEEN SURVIVOR DESCRIBES THE SHOOTINGS ON NAKBA DAY BY ISRAELI SOLDIERS

azzeh

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Despite widespread media attention and calls for investigations from international and local human rights organizations, Israel continues to cover up and guarantee the impunity of the occupation soldiers responsible for the Nakba Day Beitunia killings.

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“I felt something hot inside”: Palestinian teen describes Nakba Day shooting by Israeli soldiers

ACCOUNTS FROM FORMER ISRAELI SOLDIERS THAT ‘CAN AND WILL BE HELD AGAINST THEM IN A COURT OF LAW’

Kudos to all of the following who had the courage to speak the truth!

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Stories from an occupation: the Israelis who broke silence

A group called Breaking the Silence has spent 10 years collecting accounts from Israeli soldiers who served in the Palestinian territories. To mark the milestone, 10 hours’ worth of testimony was read to an audience in Tel Aviv. Here we print some extracts.
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Children of the occupation: growing up in Palestine

Peter Beaumont Tel Aviv FOR

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Israeli soldiers arrest Palestinian protest against Jewish settlement

Israeli soldiers arrest a Palestinian after clashes at a protest against a Jewish settlement in the West Bank near Ramallah, January 2014. Photograph: Mohamad Torokman/Reuters

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The young soldier stopped to listen to the man reading on the stage in Tel Aviv’s Habima Square, outside the tall façade of Charles Bronfman Auditorium. The reader was Yossi Sarid, a former education and environment minister. His text is the testimony of a soldier in the Israel Defence Forces, one of 350 soldiers, politicians, journalists and activists who on Friday – the anniversary of Israel’s occupation of Palestinian land in 1967 – recited first-hand soldiers’ accounts for 10 hours straight in Habima Square, all of them collected by the Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence.

When one of the group’s researchers approached the soldier, they chatted politely out of earshot and then phone numbers were exchanged. Perhaps in the future this young man will give his own account to join the 950 testimonies collected by Breaking the Silence since it was founded 10 years ago.

In that decade, Breaking the Silence has collected a formidable oral history of Israeli soldiers’ highly critical assessments of the world of conflict and occupation. The stories may be specific to Israel and its occupation of the Palestinian territories but they have a wider meaning, providing an invaluable resource that describes not just the nature of Israel’s occupation but of how occupying soldiers behave more generally. They describe how abuses come from boredom; from the orders of ambitious officers keen to advance in their careers; or from the institutional demands of occupation itself, which desensitises and dehumanises as it creates a distance from the “other”.

In granular detail, the tens of thousands of words narrated on Friday told of the humdrum and the terrible: the humiliating treatment of Palestinians at checkpoints, shootings and random assaults. Over the years the Israeli military’s response has been that these stories are the exceptions, not the rule, accounts of a few bad apples’ actions.

“What we wanted to show by reading for 10 hours is that the things described in the testimonies we have collected are not exceptional, rather they are unexceptional,” says Yehuda Shaul, one of the founders of the group and a former soldier himself.

Shaul breaks off to greet the European Union ambassador and a woman soldier who served in his own unit whom he has not seen for years. We talk about the solitary soldier in the square, now talking to the researcher. “We’ll get in contact. See if he wants to talk. Perhaps meet for coffee. Then, when we interview people, we ask them to recommend us to their friends. We might get 10 phone numbers, of whom three will talk to us.”

It is not only word of mouth that produces Breaking the Silence’s interviews. At the annual conferences that soldiers leaving the army attend to prepare them for the return to civilian life, researchers will try to talk to soldiers outside. Shaul explains why he and his colleagues have dedicated themselves to this project, why he believes it is as necessary today as when he first spoke out a decade ago about his own experience as a soldier in Hebron. “In Israeli politics today the occupation is absent. It’s not an issue for the public. It has become normal – not second nature; the occupation has become part of our nature. The object of events like today is for us to occupy the public space with the occupation.”

His sentiments are reflected by the Israeli novelist and playwright AB Yehoshua, who gets on the stage to read a comment piece he had written the day before to mark the event. “The great danger to Israeli society,” Yehoshua explains, “is the danger of weariness and repression. We no longer have the energy and patience to hear about another act of injustice.”

A man appears holding a handwritten sign that condemns Breaking the Silence as “traitors”. Some of those attending try to usher him away while others try to engage him in conversation. A journalist asks Shaul if the man is “pro-army”. “I’m pro-army,” Shaul answers immediately. “I’m not a pacifist, although some of our members have become pacifists. I’m not anti-army, I am anti-occupation.”

ISRAELI SOLDIERS’ OWN WORDS

Nadav Weiman

Nadav Weiman. Photograph: Quique Kierszenbaum

SERGEANT NADAV WEIMAN
2005-08, Nachal Reconnaissance Unit, Jenin
We’d spread out above Jenin on “the stage”, which is a tiny mountain top. That evening an arrest mission was in progress, there were riots inside the refugee camp, and we sat above and provided sniper coverfor the operation. Things got rolling and there were arrests, some rioting began in the city.

There was random peripheral fire so there were generally no people on rooftops. Some time in the middle of the night, we detected someone on a roof. We focused our sights on him, not knowing for sure whether or not he was a scout. But we targeted him and got an OK to fire because he was on a rooftop very close to one of our forces.

We were several snipers, and we took him down … Later when we got back to Jalame, it started: “Was he armed or not?” But we’d got our OK from the battalion commander. He was also the one to come and speak with us when we got back to the base in Jalame. We were with the guys with whom we sat to debrief after the action, and it was wall-to-wall, “You don’t realise how lucky you are to have actually fired in an operation. That hardly ever happens, you are so lucky.”

And according to the way we implemented the rules of engagement, we declared him a target by documenting him. We thought the Palestinian had been speaking on the phone, he seemed to be raising his hand to his head, looking sideways, going back and forth, just like a person scouting and sending information back. You could see the angles of his body, his whole conduct facing the soldiers who were north of him, in the alley below, a few metres away.

SERGEANT, ANONYMOUS
Undisclosed Reservist unit, Gaza Strip 2009, Operation Cast Lead
The actual objective remained rather vague. We were told our objective was to fragment the Strip, in fact we were told that while we were there, not knowing how long, we would have to raze the area as much as possible. Razing is a euphemism for systematic destruction. Two reasons were given for house demolitions. One reason was operational. That’s when a house is suspected to contain explosive, tunnels, when all kinds of wires are seen, or digging. Or we have intelligence information making it suspect. Or it’s a source of fire, whether light arms or mortars, missiles, Grads [rockets], all that stuff. Those are houses we demolish.

Then we’re told some will be destroyed for “the day after”. The rationale is to leave a sterile area behind us and the best way to do that is by razing it. In practical terms, it means you take a house that’s not suspect, its only transgression is that it stands on a hill in Gaza. I can even say that in a talk with my battalion commander, he mentioned this and said half smiling, half sad, that this is something to add to his list of war crimes. So he himself understood there was a problem.

Tal Wasser

Tal Wasser. Photograph: Quique Kierszenbaum

SERGEANT TAL WASSER
2006-09, Oketz (canine special forces), Nablus
Standing at the roadblock for eight hours a day puts everyone under this endless pressure. Everyone’s constantly yelling, constantly nervous, impatient … venting on the first Palestinian to cross your path. If a Palestinian annoys one of the soldiers, one of the things they’d do is throw him in the Jora, which is a small cell, like a clothing store dressing room. They close the metal door on him and that would be his punishment for annoying, for being bad.

Within all the pressure and the stress of the roadblock, the Palestinian would often be forgotten there. No one would remember that he put a Palestinian there, further emphasising the irrelevance and insignificance of the reason he was put there in the first place. Sometimes it was only after hours that they’d suddenly remember to let him out and continue the inspection at the roadblock.

SERGEANT, ANONYMOUS
Nablus Regional Brigade, Nablus, 2014
“Provocation and reaction” is the act of entering a village, making a lot of noise, waiting for the stones to be thrown at you and then you arrest them, saying: “There, they’re throwing stones.”

Lots of vehicles move inside the whole village, barriers. A barrier seems to be the army’s legitimate means to stop terrorists. We’re talking about Area B [under civilian Palestinian control and Israeli security control], but the army goes in there every day, practically, provoking stone throwings. Just as any Palestinian is suspect, this is the same idea. It could be a kid’s first time ever throwing a stone, but as far as the army is concerned, we’ve caught the stone thrower.

Avner Gvaryahu former Israeli soldier

Avner Gvaryahu. Photograph: Quique Kierszenbaum

SERGEANT AVNER GVARYAHU
2004-07 Orev (special anti-tank unit), Nablus
It was when I was a sergeant, after we had finished training. 200 [the number of the commander] said to us unequivocally: “That’s how you’re ranked. With Xs. Every night I want you to be looking for ‘contact’ [an exchange of fire] and that’s how you’ll be ranked.”

At some point I realised that someone who wants to succeed has to bring him dead people. There’s no point in bringing him arrests. [The message was:] “Arrests are routine, the battalions are making arrests. You’re the spearhead, the army has invested years in you, now I want you to bring me dead terrorists.”

And that’s what pushed us, I believe. What we’d do was go out night after night, drawing fire, go into alleys that we knew were dangerous. There were arrests, there were all kinds of arrests. But the high point of the night was drawing fire, creating a situation where they fired at us.

It’s a situation, totally insane, you’re in it, it’s hard to explain. You’re looking through the binoculars and searching for someone to kill. That’s what you want to do. And you want to kill him. But do you want to kill him? But that’s your job.

And you’re still looking through the binoculars and you’re starting to get confused. Do I want to? Don’t I want to? Maybe I actually want them to miss.

SERGEANT, ANONYMOUS
Kfir Brigade, Tul Karem, 2008
There was one checkpoint that was divided into three lanes: there’s a settlement, a checkpoint, and then Israeli territory. In the middle, there’s a Palestinian village, so they just split the checkpoint into three lanes. Three lanes, and the brigade commander ordered that Jews should only wait at the checkpoint for 10 minutes. Because of that we had to have a special lane for them, and everyone else, the Palestinians and Israeli Arabs, had to wait in the other two lanes. I remember that settlers would come, go around the Arabs, and just did it naturally. I went over to a settler and said: “Why are you going around? There’s a line here, sir.” He said: “You really think I’m going to wait behind an Arab?” He began to raise his voice at me. “You’re going to hear from your brigade commander.”

Gil Hillel

Gil Hillel. Photograph: Quique Kierszenbaum

GIL HILLEL
2001-03, Sachlav (military police), Hebron
On my first or second day in Hebron, my commanders asked me to go on a “doll”, a foot patrol that we conduct in the casbah and Jewish settlement. I agreed, it seemed cool. It was my first time in the field, come on, let’s do it. We went on patrol, into the casbah, and I think that was the first time I sensed the existential fear of living under constant threat.

We started the doll and I started feeling bad. The first time in the field is not simple. One of my commanders, the veteran among them, took an old Palestinian man, just took him aside to some alley and started beating him up. And I … it wasfine by all the others … I sort of looked at them and said: “What is he doing? Why is he doing that? What happened? Did he do anything? Is he a threat? A terrorist? Did we find something?” So they said: “No, it’s OK.” I then approached my commander, the [one] who trained me, and asked: “What are you doing?” He said: “Gil, stop it.”

And that really scared me. I was scared of their reactions, of the situation we were in. I felt bad with what went on there, but I kept quiet. I mean, what can I do? My commander told me to shut up. We left there and went back to the company and I went to my commander and said: “What are you doing? Why did you do that?” So he said: “That’s the way it is. It’s either him or me and it’s me and …”

They took him aside and just beat him up. They beat him up, they punched him. And slapped him, all for no reason. I mean, he just happened to walk by there, by mistake.

SERGEANT, ANONYMOUS
Nachal Brigade, 50th Battalion, Hebron, 2010
The Jewish settlers of Hebron constantly curse the Arabs. An Arab who passes by too closely gets cursed: “May you burn, die.”

On Shuhada Street there’s a very short section where Arabs may walk as well, which leads to Tel Rumeida neighbourhood. Once I was sent there and we found three Jewish kids hitting an old Arab woman. Another man from the Jewish settlement happened along and also joined them in yelling at the woman: “May you die!” When we got there they were mainly yelling, but there had clearly been blows dealt as well. I think they even threw stones at her.

I believe the [policeman] was called but ended up not doing anything. The general atmosphere was that there was no point in summoning the police – the policeman is a local settler from Kiryat Arba who comes to pray with the Hebron settlers at the Tomb of the Patriarchs on Fridays.

Nadav Bigelman former Israeli soldier

Nadav Bigelman. Photograph: Quique Kierszenbaum

SERGEANT NADAV BIGELMAN
2007-10, Nachal Brigade, 50th Battalion, Hebron
During patrols inside the casbah we’d do many “mappings”. Mappings mean going into a house we have no intelligence on. We go in to see what’s inside, who lives there. We didn’t search for weapons or things like that. The mappings were designed to make the Palestinians feel that we are there all the time.

We go in, walk around, look around. The commander takes a piece of paper and … makes a drawing of the house, what it looks like inside, and I had a camera. I was told to bring it. They said: “You take all the people, stand them against the wall and take their picture.” Then [the pictures are] transferred to, I don’t know, the General Security Service, the battalion or brigade intelligence unit, so they have information on what the people look like. What the residents look like. I’m a young soldier, I do as they say. I take their pictures, a horrible experience in itself, because taking people’s pictures at 3am, I … it humiliated them, I just can’t describe it.

And the interesting thing? I had the pictures for around a month. No one came to get them. No commander asked about them, no intelligence officer took them. I realised it was all for nothing. It was just to be there. It was like a game.

SERGEANT, ANONYMOUS
Paratrooper, 2002, Nablus
We took over a central house, set up positions, and one of the sharpshooters identified a man on a roof, two roofs away, I think he was between 50 and 70 metres away, not armed. I looked at the man through the night vision – he wasn’t armed. It was two in the morning. A man without arms, walking on the roof, just walking around. We reported it to the company commander. The company commander said: “Take him down.” [The sharpshooter] fired, took him down. The company commander basically ordered, decided via radio, the death sentence for that man. A man who wasn’t armed.

I saw with my own eyes that the guy wasn’t armed. The report also said: “A man without arms on the roof.” The company commander declared him a lookout, meaning he understood that the guy was no threat to us, and he gave the order to kill him and we shot him. I myself didn’t shoot, my friend shot and killed him. And basically you think, you see in the United States there’s the death penalty, for every death sentence there are like a thousand appeals and convictions, and they take it very seriously, and there are judges and learned people, and there are protests and whatever. And here a 26-year-old guy, my company commander, sentenced an unarmed man to death.

ENDING THE OCCUPATION, HOUSE BY HOUSE, VILLAGE BY VILLAGE

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They confront the soldiers, who try to give orders to the villagers, but instead the villagers order the soldiers out of the house. At one point, when a women pushes a soldier to get him out of the house, the soldier turns around and appears to threaten her with his weapon.

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Video: Palestinian villagers expel Israeli soldiers from West Bank home

This video shows villagers in Silwad, east of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, expelling a group of Israeli soldiers from a home they occupied.

In the video, a group of community members – women and men – knock on the door. A distressed woman answers and says the soldiers had come into the house and confiscated the family’s telephones and keys.

The villagers then search the house and find the heavily armed occupation soldiers in a bedroom.

They confront the soldiers, who try to give orders to the villagers, but instead the villagers order the soldiers out of the house. At one point, when a women pushes a soldier to get him out of the house, the soldier turns around and appears to threaten her with his weapon.

Wattan TV reports that the video was shot by journalist Muath Mishal, who gave this account of the incident: relatives of the elderly couple living in the house had attempted to reach the family by telephone.

When they were unable to do so, they became worried and suspicious that soldiers had entered the house. That is when they went over and liberated the house from Israeli occupation, as the video shows. According to Mishal, the soldiers had entered the house on Thursday night.

The video has been widely circulated on social media and Palestinian websites, includingQuds News Network and Donia Alwatan.

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