IN SONG ~~ LOVE AND PEACE FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE WALL

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Let there be peace on earth; let it begin in me… for love is all we need.

Moved by a summer of pain and suffering in the Middle East, at home and around the world, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson have responded in the form of a prayerful, riveting and emotionally raw music video, produced by Josh Nelson.

Musical artists with a lifelong commitment to Israel, trans-denominational appeal and a message of unity for the Jewish community and the world at large, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson were compelled to record the legendary melody composed by the late, great Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach in the midst of the violence in Israel and Gaza…and in the face of the resurgence of anti-Semitism around the world.

“As a Jew, as a mother and as a human being, I am terrified by the escalating hatred that I see in this world,” stated Neshama Carlebach, daughter of Shlomo Carlebach. “I grew up knowing that my father’s family ran from Nazi-occupied Europe and was aware of my deep blessing; that I was living securely and free of fear. I hear his voice in my head. This song is our prayer.”

Individually and as a creative team, Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson perform widely across the denominational spectrum of Jewish life and in secular venues as well. Deeply invested in Jewish Peoplehood, they are spiritual role models in their community. As such, they felt the urgent need to call for peace and love in the middle of this time of unprecedented conflict, they said. “We believe that all people have the right to live their lives without fear, and when we decided to speak up, we knew of no text more poignant than this prayer for peace,” said Josh Nelson.

Shlomo Carlebach’s version of “Y’hi Shalom” is beloved and meaningful for millions around the world, Jews and non-Jews alike, explained Josh Nelson. “We hope that this recording will inspire humanity to come together and to begin to move in a new direction. There are no simple answers to the incredibly complex situation in Israel and Gaza, but the message in this song may be a place to start.”

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The words are unadorned, but Eid’s performance is haunting, set against images from Israel’s most recent massacre in Gaza:

Between contractions and pain
We will be reborn

Between contractions and pain
Wisdom will be born
The song of freedom will be born

All that has passed and gone
Is still being born in your eyes

At the end of the video are these words from Eid himself:

The Palestinian people, and Gazans in particular, have been living an unending massacre since 1948. We can no longer negotiate about improving the conditions of oppression; it is either the full menu of rights, or nothing. And that means the end of occupation, apartheid and colonialism.

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SONGS FOR THE THREE MARTYRS

First see yesterday’s post … MISSISSIPPI BURNT DOWN 50 YEARS AGO TODAY

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Here are some songs written to celebrate their lives and honor their deaths, as well as one Yiddish song, “Donna Donna,” written a quarter-century earlier but profoundly appropriate, I think, to the day. The performers are Tom Paxton; Simon & Garfunkel; Harry Belafonte (singing a Pete Seeger-Frances Taylor song); Joan Baez; Richard and Mimi Farina (she was Joan Baez’s sister); Nechama Hendel; and wrapping it up, one of my favorite Phil Ochs songs, “Here’s to the State of Mississippi.” All the songs were written by the performers except where noted. (Originally appeared AT)

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Tom Paxton: “Goodman, Schwerner and Chaney.”

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Harry Belafonte: “Those Three Are on My Mind.” (Written by Pete Seeger and Frances Taylor. Hear Pete singing it here.)

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Simon and Garfunkel: “He Was My Brother” (for Andrew Goodman, their friend and classmate at Queens College).

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Richard and Mimi Farina: “Michael, Andrew and James.”

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Nechama Hendel: “Donna Donna” (the Yiddish original, by Aaron Zeitlin and Sholom Secunda). (For Joan Baez’s famous performance of the English version [“…Calves are easily bound and slaughtered, never knowing the reason why, but whoever treasures freedom like the swallow has learned to fly”] click here.)

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Phil Ochs: “Here’s to the State of Mississippi.”

MAGICAL MEMORIES OF PETE SEEGER

Without Pete Seeger, the state of our union is far worse today than it was yesterday.

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Moving Tribute from Pete’s sister Peggy Seeger
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Woody Guthrie’s declaration about songs that tear people down, and songs that give people strength. Studs Terkel with Pete Seeger, Judy Collins, Arlo Guthrie, and Fred Hellerman. An excerpt from a 1976 PBS tribute to Woody Guthrie.
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Harry Belafonte and Arlo Guthrie induct Pete Seeger into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame during the 1996 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.
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With Pete and children, it was always one young soul to another … decade after decade. In this song, one young hero helps to defeat a giant that threatens the whole village.
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Click HERE for more musical tributes

ISRAELI ARTISTS COLLABORATE WITH BDS SUPPORTERS

The Boycott From Within is growing as Israeli artists join those supporting the International BDS Movement …

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Why David Broza Collaborates With BDS Supporter Roger Waters

By Jon Kalish

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David Broza with producer and country star Steve Earle. 

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In early 2013 singer-songwriter David Broza spent a little over a week in an East Jerusalem recording studio working on his new album. The Israeli superstar says it has been a life-long dream to have Israeli and Palestinian musicians work together on a project. The resulting album is “East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem” (S-Curve Records), recorded in the studio that is the home base of Palestinian group Sabreen. It was produced by two Americans, Steve Greenberg and Steve Earle, and features a cameo by the Haitian-American star Wyclef Jean on the title track.

Broza and Jean, who co-wrote “East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem,” sing, “Same face in the Haifa Is the same face out in Nevada / Same face in Nablus Is the same face out in New Orleans singing the blues.” In the chorus they croon “shalom/salam.”

Israeli musicians Gadi Seri and Yossi Sassi ventured into East Jerusalem for the recording sessions, where they were joined by Palestinian musicians Elias Wakileh, Said Murad and Yair Dallal. The Palestinian Hip Hop duo G-Town, Palestinian-Israeli singer Mira Awad and the Jerusalem YMCA Youth Choir also recorded with Broza. The choir, which is described as half-Palestinian, half-Israeli, is seen in the music video of Broza’s rendition of Nick Lowe’s “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding.” The video opens with images of an Israeli soldier, piles of litter in East Jerusalem streets, and Broza interacting with Palestinian teenagers.

Broza also does covers of songs by Elvis Costello and Pink Floyd. Costello and Roger Waters, the Pink Floyd front man, are known for supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions of Israel. In a recent interview, Waters spoke of the “systematic racist apartheid Israeli regime.” But Waters’ take on the Israeli/Palestinian conflict didn’t phase Broza, who calls Water’s song “Mother” “one of the most anti-boycott, boundary-breaking songs ever.”

At a gathering in early December to promote the new album, Broza told The Arty Semite “The greatest artists can say the most ludicrous, ridiculous, self-opinionated, righteous statements and it doesn’t take away from their art. Everybody’s entitled to their own opinion. It’s intelligent opinion, I believe, because these are intelligent people, but I don’t sit and judge their intelligence. I judge their art and their art is brilliant and keeps on shining.”

It’s worth noting that in 2005 Broza helped produce a Roger Waters show in Israel which Waters threatened to cancel after learning that Palestinians wouldn’t attend the performance. Broza arranged a new location and 65,000 tickets were sold.

“The only thing I asked him to do at the time,” recalls Broza, “was to come and plant an olive tree up on the hill where the Israeli/Palestinian village is and he didn’t. I planted it. So, he owes me one.”

The new album is officially released on January 14, the same date that Broza kicks off a U.S. tour at the Highline Ballroom in New York. Broza spends the rest of January performing in Los Angeles, Charleston, West Virginia, Washington, D.C., Cambridge and Chicago.

DID BOB DYLAN LEARN HOW TO BE A RACIST WHEN HE VISITED ISRAEL?

The American singer Bob Dylan is being investigated in France after a Croatian community organization alleged that comments he made to Rolling Stone magazine last year amounted to incitement to racial hatred, Paris prosecutors said on Monday.
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dylan - Reuters - April 10 2011
Singer Bob Dylan performs during his show in Vietnam’s southern Ho Chi Minh city, April 10, 2011.Photo by Reuters
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Once the voice of the American Protest Movement …. once the voice of the Anti-Segregation and Peace Movments …. Now the voice of racism???
Despite appeals not to perform in Israel two years ago, he did just that.
‘The times they really are a’changing’
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Bob Dylan investigated in France for ‘racist’ comments

Croatian organization alleges singer incited to racial hatred when he said in an interview that “just like Jews can sense Nazi blood and the Serbs can sense Croatian blood.”

By Reuters
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The American singer Bob Dylan is being investigated in France after a Croatian community organization alleged that comments he made to Rolling Stone magazine last year amounted to incitement to racial hatred, Paris prosecutors said on Monday.

In the interview, published in the magazine’s September 27, 2012 edition, the singer said racism was holding America back.

“If you got a slave master or (Ku Klux) Klan in your blood, blacks can sense that,” he was quoted as saying. “That stuff lingers to this day. Just like Jews can sense Nazi blood and the Serbs can sense Croatian blood.”

The formal investigation followed a legal complaint from the organization, CRICCF, which is based in France, alleging that the comments as carried in the French version of the magazine violated French racial hatred laws.

In France, racism complaints automatically trigger formal investigations, irrespective of the merits of the case.

Dylan was awarded France’s prestigious Legion d’Honneur award last month in Paris. Culture Minister Aurelie Filippetti said that, for French people, he embodied a “subversive cultural force that can change people and the world.”

CRICCF did not return an email seeking comment. Dylan’s manager did not immediately respond to a phone call. Rolling Stone said it had no comment.

HOLLYWOOD STRIKES BACK AT BDS

Image ‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff

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‘Creative Community for Peace’ is a strange name for a group whose website offers a view of Israel aimed at pop artists and their followers, showcasing Israel’s cultural diversity and technology. But it touches only briefly on issues relating to Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians, the topic at the core of the boycott campaign.
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Hollywood Insiders Form Group To Counter Celebrity BDS Campaigns

Creative Community for Peace Lines Up Showbiz Execs

By Nathan Guttman

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For activists on both sides of the battle over boycotting Israel, there’s no business quite like show business.

The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, which aims to isolate Israel because of its occupation of the West Bank, has often had trouble gaining traction on other fronts. But the performing arts have emerged as the one field in which calls to boycott the Jewish state have yielded some response. Roger Waters, Elvis Costello, Annie Lennox and Stevie Wonder, among others, have responded to calls from grassroots activists by canceling dates in Israel or declining to play there, or at Israel-related events, even as other performers, including Lady Gaga, Alicia Keys, Bob Dylan and Madonna, have pointedly ignored such calls.

But lately, a group opposed to BDS has been taking a notably different approach. Unlike its opponents, who focus on building grassroots pressure by fans, from the bottom up, the Creative Community for Peace has assembled an impressive roster of top entertainment executives supportive of Israel who are seeking to influence artists from the top down to perform there.

“Because our members work within the industry, we are able to use our personal contacts to proactively reach out to artists and their representatives to provide balanced information about Israel,” said Lana Melman, CCFP’s director. “We prepare them for the possibility of a boycott campaign, educate them about Israel and the artistic freedom there, and work to arrest potential cancellations.”

CCFP, which formed in 2011, does not yet have its status as a tax-exempt charity recognized by the Internal Revenue Service. But while awaiting the processing of its application, it has partnered with StandWithUs, a group widely perceived as being on the far right of the pro-Israel spectrum. Pending acceptance of CCFP’s application, donors to the organization send their contributions to StandWithUs, an already recognized public charity. StandWithUs channels these donations to the newer group. This enables CCFP supporters to claim their donations as tax deductions. CCFP also currently shares office space with StandWithUs.

These are legal and commonly used practices for new groups in the not-for-profit world, according to tax experts. But CCFP’s choice to partner with StandWithUs — a group that has co-produced videos with Israel’s foreign minister, Danny Ayalon, rejecting the notion that the West Bank is occupied — has moved critics to question its real agenda.

“Why not align themselves with an organization that is closer to their projected position as apolitical?” asked Andrew Kadi of the pro-boycott U.S. Campaign to End Israeli Occupation.

CCFP’s founding member David Renzer, in an email to the Forward, said his organization has “always operated independently” of StandWithUs and that “there is no day-to-day relationship” with the group.”

The criticism has not stopped CCFP from bringing together an impressive roster of Hollywood heavies behind its banner. They include, among others, Ben Silverman, a former co-chair of NBC Entertainment; Jody Gerson, co-president of Sony/ATV Music Publishing; Gary Ginsberg, executive vice president of Time Warner; Samuel Schwartz, co-founder of the music talent agency Gorfaine/Schwartz, and Ron Fair, chief creative officer and executive vice president of Virgin Records and former chairman of Gefen Productions. Fair has also produced albums for acts such as the Black Eyed Peas and Christina Aguilera, and these high profile connections underline the kind of personal and professional relationships the group can bring into play.

The latest show business clash over Israel involved Grammy award winner Keys, who performed in Tel Aviv on July 4 despite a massive mobilization of critics that organized a petition signed by 16,000 people, calling on Keys not to “play apartheid Israel.” The protest was joined by Pink Floyd musician Waters and by author Alice Walker, who wrote a series of personal open letters to Keys appealing to her to boycott Israel.

In response, the music industry executives on CCFP’s advisory board contested Walker’s comparison of Israel to apartheid-era South Africa. The group also organized a counter petition in which more than 18,000 signatories called on all artists to proceed with their plans to perform in Israel and to allow “the power of your music to help bring hope and peace to the region.”

At the end of the day, it was the pro-Israel activists who won this battle when Keys went ahead with her July 4 performance.

Renzer, former head of Universal Music Publishing Group; Steve Schnur, a top executive at the leading video game producer EA, and Ran Geffen-Lifshitz, an Israel-based music producer, are the founders of CCFP.

The group’s website offers a view of Israel aimed at pop artists and their followers, showcasing Israel’s cultural diversity and technology. But it touches only briefly on issues relating to Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians, the topic at the core of the boycott campaign.

The website describes CCFP as a group composed of members with diverse political views about how Israel can attain peace. But it also takes positions that appear to be held by only a narrow spectrum among Jews who support Israel. Among other things, it argues against the notion that settlements are an obstacle to peace with the Palestinians though Secretary of State John Kerry recently stated that “the United States of America views all the settlements as illegitimate.” A recent survey of American Jews by the Pew Research Center found only 17% of American Jews believe that settlements help Israel’s security.

As does StandWithUs, CCFP also disputes the use of the term “occupation” — a description that even right-wing Israeli leaders such as Ariel Sharon have acknowledged as accurate — to describe Israel’s hold over the West Bank.

The website also strongly challenges the pro-boycott activists’ claims of Israeli apartheid practices as a “false description.”

The group’s success is hard to measure. Its website is packed with photos of internationally acclaimed artists performing in Israel and posing on the streets of Tel Aviv or at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. It also boasts testimonials and videos of artists that have visited Israel, from Dylan to Justin Bieber.

Still, it is not clear how many artists have been swayed by CCFP’s pro-Israel campaign, or what role CCFP or other activists played in ensuring that artists include Israel in their world tours.

David Siegel, Israel’s consul general in Los Angeles, has no doubts. “They are effective because they work from inside the industry,” he said. “They have gained a lot of resonance, and they are, essentially, the only organization focused on the cultural boycott.”

In terms of assets inside the entertainment community, groups on the other side of the battle can mainly deploy Waters, the former frontman for Pink Floyd. Waters not only supports the boycott, but has also taken it upon himself to reach out to fellow performing artists to convince them to scratch their Israel concert plans.

Last December, it was Waters who wrote to Wonder, calling on him to reconsider his performance at an event hosted by Friends of the Israel Defense Forces, in Los Angeles. Wonder canceled the planned gig. BDS supporters also took pride in convincing Costello to call off](http://forward.com/articles/128185/boycott-targets-stars-from-elvis-to-elton/#ixzz2gmK4OfMQ) his performance in Tel Aviv.

But while the public battle has focused on artists already scheduled to perform in Israel, a music industry insider who has been involved in bringing top-of-the-line artists to Israel noted that the greater concern rests with those who have not yet scheduled their concert tours.

“It is difficult to bring artists to Israel as it is,” the industry executive said, noting the relatively small market Israel represents. “But politics makes it even more complicated. These people don’t like to get involved in it.”

Siegel, Israel’s top diplomat involved in reaching out to the entertainment industry, underscored this point. “We’re talking about artists that are used to having everyone love them, and now they are getting hate mail and petitions,” he said. “That’s why the best way to talk with them is from within the industry.”

Source

ISRAEL DESPERATELY NEEDS A ROGER WATERS

He is no Roger Waters, the singer who opted to boycott Israel. We and he don’t have a single, brave and honest performer like Waters. Not one.

Israel has no Roger Waters

Those who have attacked, poisoned, uprooted and burned will be coming this evening to applaud Ehud Banai, a singer representing Israel’s heart and soul.

By Gideon Levy

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Pink Floyd co-founder and bass guitarist Roger Waters performs his 'The Wall' live concert in Buchar
Pink Floyd co-founder and bass guitarist Roger Waters performs his ‘The Wall’ live concert in Bucharest, August 28, 2013. Photo by Reuters

There’s a show on tonight. Hundreds will put on their holiday finest, maybe dressing in white. They’ll grab their weapons and kids, and off they’ll go. They’ll park their cars in the parking lot that was especially arranged (without permission, of course) on land owned by the Shraytah family, and in they’ll go to the West Bank site that was once the Palestinian village of Sussia.

Until 1986, it was home to hundreds of residents who lived in caves and niches there. They were expelled by Israel in an “expropriation for public use,” with the administration of the site turned over to the nearby Jewish settlement (also called Sussia) as an additional source of income – “for public use,” of course.

At the rear of the site, the settlers had set up several huts, where the Palestinians became squatters. They were evicted from their new location twice, until the High Court of Justice ruled in 2001 that a “mistake” had been committed. That happens, but the threat of eviction is again hovering over the Palestinians.

Throngs of people will be coming to Sussia this evening. Some will be people who have poisoned Palestinians’ wells, attacked Palestinian shepherds, and uprooted their trees and burned their fields. People from Sussia, the Lucifer farm, the Maon farm, Mitzpeh Yair, Avigayil, Mitzpeh Asahel, and elsewhere. A popular singer will be performing in this violent no-man’s-land, this apartheid district. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome that performer of strong opinions, Ehud Banai.

Banai was evasive on his Facebook page: “I wanted to come to perform at Sussia despite my views … to convey a message that we should come together in the spirit of the Sukkot holiday,” he wrote.

He apologized to the “residents” – meaning, of course, just the settlers – for his previous, premature notice that his show was being canceled. He had come to an agreement with the head of the local settlement council, Zviki Bar-Hai, that his concert would not take place – “due to the not-good atmosphere that developed around it” – but immediately backed down, for reasons that are not clear.

A resident of the Palestinian village of Sussia, Nasser Nawaj’a, responded to Banai, also on Facebook. “When you perform at the site, Mr. Banai, look around you. You will still be able to see remnants of the village, the caves where we used to live, and the water holes that we drank from.”

Nasser was just 4 when he was evicted from his home, a site that is now the location where Banai will be performing this evening. And for the information of a singer who expressed the wish to bring people together, Banai should know that Nasser’s elderly father, Mohammed, attempted to visit the site. A documentary film immortalized the occasion. The father was expelled by the settlers, to his tearful chagrin.

In his song “Aharei has’ara” (“After the storm”), Banai sang: “Just for one woman / whose home the winds took away / it’s as if time stopped.” He should think about that lyric this evening. And in an entirely different context, Banai once sang, in his song “Zmancha avar” (“Your time has passed”), “We are guests here for the moment / look around / that is not our bus.” And, again in a different context, “Bluz kna’ani” (“Canaanite blues”), he sang about how “hahosheh gover kan” (“darkness is taking over here”).

Darkness is indeed taking over. And this evening it will extend its reach even further. Banai will give the settlers a good time with his music, which, of course, is his prerogative – although he should have boycotted them. The man should have performed somewhere else this evening. In Khirbet Makhoul, in the Jordan Valley, for example, where dozens of Palestinians remain without a roof over their heads after the Israeli army demolished their village. But performing at such a place would never occur to an Israeli singer. Banai could also have performed at Sussia but invited the Palestinians who were evicted from there, in an effort to bring people together. Instead – because he is “opposed to boycotts” – he opted to perform at a Sussia where, as a practical matter, Palestinians are denied admission. He opted to perform there “despite his views,” which remain unknown.

I would have had more respect for him if he had declared allegiance to the right wing. He is no Roger Waters, the singer who opted to boycott Israel. We and he don’t have a single, brave and honest performer like Waters. Not one.

I once met an elderly shepherd, Khalil Nawaj’a, and his wife, Tamam, at Sussia. The two had been attacked twice, by settlers with clubs. I also once saw dead and poisoned sheep in nearby Khirbet Tawani, and also saw a red jeep leave the settlement of Sussia. The occupants of the vehicle stole their olive harvest by force.

Those who have attacked, poisoned, uprooted and burned will be coming this evening to applaud Banai, a singer representing Israel’s heart and soul.

 

 

Written FOR

JON STEWART HOSTS THE NEW ARAB SPRING DIRECT FROM CAIRO

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Stewart also appeared to take a gentle dig at the opposition, who hope demonstrations planned for June 30 can force Mursi from power after just a year in office. It took Americans 100 years before a president was impeached for the first time, Stewart said, “For you guys to do it in one year, it’s very impressive.”
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‘Egypt’s Jon Stewart’ Hosts the Real Thing

Funny Man Says Cairo Regime Should ‘Handle a Joke’

By Reuters

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Jon Stewart took his politically engaged American satire to Cairo on Friday, appearing on a show hosted by the man known as “Egypt’s Jon Stewart”, who has faced investigation for insulting the president and Islam.

Among barbs aimed at Egypt’s ruling Islamists and others, Stewart praised host Bassem Youssef for taking risks to poke fun. “If your regime is not strong enough to handle a joke,” he said, “then you don’t have a regime.”

Youssef is a cardiologist whose online comedy clips inspired by Stewart’s “Daily Show” won him wild popularity and a prime-time TV show after the 2011 revolution that ended military rule. He paid tribute to his guest as a personal inspiration as the pair traded gags over Stewart’s impressions of a visit to Cairo.

Stewart in turn played down any difficulties his wit created for him in the United States, telling Youssef: “I tell you this, it doesn’t get me into the kind of trouble it gets you into. I get in trouble, but nowhere near what happens to you.”

With Egypt still in ferment and elected Islamist President Mohamed Mursi facing off against liberals who fear he plans to smother personal freedoms, Youssef was released on bail after being questioned in March over alleged insults to Mursi and the channel he appears on was threatened with losing its licence.

Criticising such moves, which have also drawn reproaches for Egypt from the U.S. government, Stewart said: “A joke has never shot teargas at a group of people in a park. It’s just talk.

“What Bassem is doing … is showing that satire can still be relevant, that it can carve out space in a country for people to express themselves. Because that’s all democracy is.”

He took aim at Mursi’s controversial decision this week to name a member of a hardline Islamist movement blamed for a massacre of tourists at Luxor in the 1990s as governor of that city. Having been brought into the studio hooded and presented as a “spy”, he spoke a few words in Arabic before saying Egypt’s president had honoured him: “I am now the mayor of Luxor.”

Stewart also appeared to take a gentle dig at the opposition, who hope demonstrations planned for June 30 can force Mursi from power after just a year in office. It took Americans 100 years before a president was impeached for the first time, Stewart said, “For you guys to do it in one year, it’s very impressive.”

Perhaps the biggest laugh in the studio, though, was for a simple crack at Egypt’s perennial traffic chaos: “I know this is an ancient civilisation,” he said. “Have you thought about traffic lights?”

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JON STEWART TAKES A POKE AT OBAMA’S FAILED VISIT TO ISRAEL

Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show returned after two weeks off the air by poking fun at the outcome of President Barack Obama’s recent trip to Israel and the West Bank, and lamenting the failures of past U.S. presidents in the peace process.

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We are f***ing powerless: Jon Stewart takes aim at Obama’s Israel visit

 The Daily Show’s take on the outcomes of U.S. President Barack Obama’s recent trip to Israel and the West Bank, and the failures of past American presidents on peace between Israel and the Palestinians.

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A screen shot of Jon Stewart on the Daily Show.
A screen shot of Jon Stewart on the Daily Show.
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Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show returned after two weeks off the air by poking fun at the outcome of President Barack Obama’s recent trip to Israel and the West Bank, and lamenting the failures of past U.S. presidents in the peace process. 

Stewart mocked Obama’s Jerusalem speech, in which the president combined what Stewart described as “a stunning declaration of American support for Israel’s right to exist,” with a call for recognition of “the Palestinian people’s right to self-determination, right to justice.”

“An American president sketching out a path to an Israeli state, to a Palestinian state, why did no one think of this sooner?” Stewart quipped.

He went on to show footage of former U.S. presidents making similar assertions, including Geroge W. Bush Jr. in 2007, Bill Clinton in 1998 and George W Bush Sr. in 1991, before shouting out “We are f***ng powerless,” and pulling out a one dollar bill with a talking George Washington also repeating the two-state message.

“The point is this: Talk is cheap, and we have done that for years, so call me when there is actually some diplomatic progress,” Stewart said, before lambasting Obama’s big success of the trip – brokering the reconciliation between Israel and Turkey, “two countries nobody knew were fighting.”

“Gee, I can’t wait to see what happens with the Bosnia and Denmark situation.”

Stewart rounded off the clip by going to Senior Middle East Correspondent Aasif Mandvi, who filled him in on the mood in the West Bank after the breakthrough in the peace talks – between Israel and Turkey. 

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Barack Atah Adonai

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Click HERE to watch video

QUEEN OF THE HAS-BEENS TO PERFORM IN ISRAEL

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The Way We Were …
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When I look back at the long career of Barbra Streisand, one paricular film comes to mind, The Way We Were. In the movie she plays a young American Jewish woman very much involved in the anti war Movement, as well as other Progressive causes. It created an image in my mind that this was a true picture of Barbra Streisand, definitely fond memories.
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The Way We Are …
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That image was shatterered today when I read she is coming to Israel to perform at the 90th birthday of Shimon Peres. Celebration of the life of a war monger. Shameful! She apparently has been to Israel a few times but chose never to perform here. Why the change of heart? Why now when a growing list of top notch performers have decided not to play for apartheid, not to play for war?
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Is this how she wants to be remembered?
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I hope you will all remember to add her name to the growing list of artists and performers that should be boycotted. Remember as well to let her know her actions are totally unacceptable. Here’s how….
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Fan mail address:

Barbra Streisand
160 West 96th Street
New York, NY 10025

Management address:

Barbra Streisand
c/o Martin Erlichman Associates, Inc.
5670 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 2400
Los Angeles, CA 90036

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Why We Boycott …
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THE OSCARS FOCUS ON APARTHEID THIS YEAR

  • Oscar-nominated films prove Israel is an apartheid state

  • Eli Ungar-Sargon

  • The Palestinian film 5 Broken Cameras offers clear and irrefutable evidence of Israeli ethnocracy.

     (Issam Rimawi / APA images)

Award season is in full swing in Los Angeles, and, for the first time in the history of the Academy Awards, two films about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are in competition for best documentary feature. For those of us invested in a just resolution to the conflict, a closer reading of these films can help decipher the meaning of this extraordinary attention.

The Gatekeepers is a classical talking-heads documentary. What sets it apart from other films in this genre is the identity of the heads doing the talking: six men who have led Israel’s Shin Bet, or Internal Security Service, from the early days of the state until the present. The film is deftly structured and moves effortlessly from history, which is served up with archival footage, to strategic analysis, which is provided against the backdrop of slick computer-generated listening rooms. The heart of the film comes through in the difficult ethical questions that Israeli director Dror Moreh occasionally interjects from behind the camera.

Narrow focus

The concept of The Gatekeepers, which Moreh continues to hammer home in his many public statements, is that these six men, who have been charged with keeping Israel safe throughout the decades, all agree that the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Stripmust end.

From an Israeli perspective, this is a rhetorical gambit from a member of the decimated left: “listen to these people,” Moreh seems to be pleading with his compatriots. These political nuances will be lost on the American public, but The Gatekeepers fits nicely into the bizarre cultural regression we are currently experiencing in the United States with shows like Homeland and films like Zero Dark Thirty. The aesthetic of The Gatekeepersplays to our fetishization of counterterrorism and its voyeuristic technologies.

What about the Palestinian perspective? Unfortunately, The Gatekeepers reduces the Palestinians to abstract ethical entities in ticking-time-bomb scenarios. Granted, this derives from the general conceit of a film that chooses to narrow its focus to these six men, but the outcome is that the only Palestinians we spend time thinking about are “terrorist masterminds.”

Worse, one of the chapters of the film is titled “Victory Is To See You Suffer.” This comes from the former Shin Bet head Ami Ayalon who credits the statement to Jabril Rajoub of the Palestinian Authority. Incredibly, Ayalon tells us that hearing Rajoub say this is what finally forced him to empathize with the Palestinians in their struggle.

Emotional resonance

In contrast, 5 Broken Cameras, is all about the Palestinian perspective. The footage that co-director Emad Burnat shot over five years at the weekly unarmed demonstrations in his village of Bilin, has an immediacy that shatters the high production value seductions of The Gatekeepers.

Made for a fraction of the cost that it took to produce that film, 5 Broken Cameras is like a punch to the gut. There is almost no historical context provided, but Burnat’s narration achieves an emotional resonance that only a first-person account can.

The Israeli co-director Guy Davidi wisely structured the film around the lifetime of the various cameras that Burnat used to document his life, each of which were eventually broken. Burnat and Davidi’s film is political in a less overt, but more subversive way than Moreh’s. It bypasses the calcified rhetoric that so often characterizes discussions of Israel and the Palestinians and cuts straight to the heart.

Like Julia Bacha’s Budrus before it, 5 Broken Cameras confronts the viewer with a reality that would be hard to believe if you weren’t watching it with your own eyes and hearing it with your own ears.

World waking up?

So what does the nomination of these two films tell us about where our culture stands on the issue of Israel and the Palestinians? Like the recent diplomatic revolt at the UN which led to the recognition of Palestine as a non-member observer state, I believe this to be a sign that the world is finally waking up to the fact that something is rotten in the State of Israel. That something, however, is still being misidentified as the occupation of 1967. The truth, of course, is that the occupation is but a symptom of a rot that runs much deeper. The problem is Israeli ethnocracy.

The fact that Israel is not a state for all its citizens and never has been is the reason that a majority of the Palestinian people live in exile as refugees. It is also the reason that the Palestinian citizens of Israel continue to live as second-class citizens. The military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip persists, because were Israel to grant citizenship to the Palestinian residents of the West Bank and Gaza, it would cease to be a Jewish-majority state.

Israel’s logic is therefore motivated by a model of nationalism that is hostile to the fundamental democratic value of equality. The occupation as seen through the lens of bothThe Gatekeepers and 5 Broken Cameras offers clear and irrefutable evidence of Israeli ethnocracy. But the occupation itself is neither the cause of, nor the solution to the conflict.

Will The Gatekeepers and 5 Broken Cameras have an impact on Israeli audiences? Unfortunately, I think not. There are already indications that The Gatekeepers has been met with indifference from the Israeli public and it looks like Davidi is facing an uphill battle in getting 5 Broken Cameras to screen to Israeli youth.

Might this change if one of the films wins an Academy Award at the end of the month? I’m pessimistic. As the recent Israeli elections demonstrated, the conflict with the Palestinians is no longer an issue that most Israelis care about. But the world is watching. And these films, along with the injustice reflected in them, now have a global audience.

Eli Ungar-Sargon is a documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. He has been working on a documentary about the Israel-Palestine conflict for the past four years. The film is now entering the final stages of post-production.

Written FOR

STEVIE WONDER SAW THE LIGHT AFTER ALL … PULLS OUT OF IDF SUPPORT CONCERT

Wonder’s representatives will claim that he did not know the nature of the group, the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces, and that he believes such a performance would be incongruent with his status as a UN “Messenger of Peace,” according to a source who has read email exchanges between Wonder’s representatives and organizers of the event.
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Stevie Wonder to pull out of IDF fundraiser

Representatives for Wonder, who performed at a 1998 gala honoring Israel’s 50th anniversary, say the performance would be incongruent with his status as a UN ‘Messenger of Peace.’

Stevie Wonder
Stevie Wonder Photo by AP

Stevie Wonder is set to pull out of a performance at a fundraiser for the Israel Defense Forces, a source told JTA.

Wonder’s representatives will claim that he did not know the nature of the group, the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces, and that he believes such a performance would be incongruent with his status as a UN “Messenger of Peace,” according to a source who has read email exchanges between Wonder’s representatives and organizers of the event.

Wonder was scheduled to headline the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces annual gala in Los Angeles on Dec. 6. The event raises millions of dollars annually to support the Israeli military.

An official of Friends of the IDF, reached at its Los Angeles office, had no comment. Wonder’s agent at Creative Artists Agency did not return a request for comment.

The spokesman for the UN Secretary General also had no comment on the matter.

The United Nations does not impose restrictions on its goodwill representatives. Wonder most recently performed at a UN concert commemoratiing its 67th anniversary. Elie Wiesel, the Nobele Peace Laureate and Holocaust memoirist who is also a staunch defender of Israel is also a UN Messenger of Peace.

Wonder had come under intense social media pressure to pull out of the event. An online petition calling on him to cancel his performance had garnered more than 3,600 signatures.

The petition was launched more than a day ago on the change.org website.

“You were arrested in 1985 protesting South African Apartheid, now we ask you: please remember that apartheid is apartheid, whether it comes from White Afrikaaner settlers of South Africa or from Jewish Israelis in Israel,” the petition reads. “Desmond Tutu has recognized that Israel’s Apartheid is worse than South Africa’s — will you stand with us against apartheid and cancel your performance at the IDF fundraiser.”

A second petition, launched by the U.S. Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation, calls on Wonder to “(p)lease continue your legacy of speaking out for the oppressed. Please be a ‘full-time lover’ of justice by standing on the right side of history and canceling your performance for the Israeli army.” 

Wonder performed at a 1998 gala honoring Israel’s 50th anniversary.

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Source

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Palestinian Doctor and Artist, Dr. Jazz produced the following before Stevie Wonder changed his mind …. it’s worth viewing for future musician’s blunders.
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PEACE THROUGH MUSIC ….. DESPITE IT ALL!

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At the beginning of the week I posted THIS which included THIS report about the tensions in the Israeli/Palestinian city of Jaffa.
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Despite the joint agenda of the Israeli right as well as their government itself, there is hope in Jaffa and in Israel as a whole. The people themselves want peace, and through their activities it will be achieved.
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One example of this is an organisation calling themselves the Arab-Jewish Community Centre in Jaffa.  A group within is the Arab & Jewish women’s choir “Shirana”. The following was sent to me by a British Blogger and friend, Charlie Pottins, both Palestinians and Israelis enjoying the sounds of Passover, TOGETHER.
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Here too we have the 99%, a group called THE PEOPLE, and we want Peace and we want it NOW!
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Below is a translation of the song in the video, sung traditionally at Passover Seders.
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The White House Seder last year
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Translation & additional lyrics: Chava Alberstein
Arrangement and conducting: Mika Danny
Piano, Mix and Mastering: Eran RANCHO Yehoshua
Frame Drum and Musical Production: Idan Toledano
Lyrics:
A little goat (2x)
My father bought for two zuzim
A little goat (2x).Then came the cat
And ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the dog
And bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the stick
And beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim.

Then came the Angel of Death
And killed the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the stick
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

Then came the Holy One
Blessed be G-d
And destroyed the Angel of Death
That killed the butcher
That slew the ox
That drank the water
That quenched the fire
That burned the sticks
That beat the dog
That bit the cat
That ate the little goat
My father bought for two zuzim

On all nights, on all nights
I questioned only four
Tonight I have one more:
How much longer will the circle of horror persist
Striker and stricken, beater and beaten,
When will this madness, when will it end,
And what is different for you, what is different?
I am different this year
I used to be a lamb and a peaceful goat
Today I am a tiger and a preying coyote
I was a dove already, and a ram
Today I dont know who I am
(My father bought for 2 zuzim)
And once more, we start from the beginning

DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY WITH APARTHEID!

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Don’t worry, be happy with apartheid, occupation, non-nation status…
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OR
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BOYCOTT THE FOLLOWING TO SHOW HIM THERE IS SOMETHING TO WORRY ABOUT AND NOTHING TO BE HAPPY ABOUT HERE!
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Bobby McFerrin, the ten-time Grammy Award winning musician will be in Tel Aviv in May for the Tel Aviv White City Music Festival. McFerrin’s most famous hit is the 1980′s song Don’t Worry Be Happy and he will perform at the festival alongside some of the biggest names in Israeli music at the festival. McFerrin will give four concerts in Tel Aviv between May 1 and May 10.
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PALESTINIANS ~~ THE NEW BLACKS

Image ‘Copyleft’ by Carlos Latuff
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In a first ever musical collaboration between South Africa and Palestine, South African band, The Mavrix, and Palestinian Oud player, Mohammed Omar, have released a music video called “The New Black”. The song is taken from The Mavrix’ upcoming album,”Pura Vida”, due for release in June 2012.

Written and composed by Jeremy Karodia and Ayub Mayet, the song was a musical reaction to the horror of the Gaza Massacre of 2008/2009 and then subsequently inspired by the book “Mornings in Jenin”, authored by Susan Abulhawa. Mayet had penned the first lyrics in 2009 after the Massacre and the song went into musical hibernation. Having read the novel, “Mornings in Jenin”, he then re-wrote the lyrics and the song evolved into its current version.

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Haidar Eid, a Gaza based BDS activist and friend of the band, heard the song in 2011 and urged the band to do a collaboration with Palestinian Oud player, Mohamed Omar. He also suggested that the band do a video highlighting the collaboration between South African and Palestinian musicians and also the similarities in the two struggles.

The song was recorded by The Mavrix in South Africa whilst Mohamed recorded the Oud in Gaza and, although never having had the opportunity to meet, the musical interplay between the musicians so far apart illustrates the empathy the musicians feel in solidarity with each other.

Produced by The Palestinian Solidarity Alliance (South Africa) and the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) along with written endorsements from Haidar Eid of PACBI, Omar Barghouti of the BDS Movement, Ali Abunimah of Electronic Intifada and Susan Abulhawa, author of “Mornings in Jenin”, the song represents a message of support from South Africans, who having transgressed and crossed over their own oppression under apartheid, stand in solidarity with Palestinians who are currently experiencing their own oppression under Israeli apartheid.

ROTTEN RACISM AND PUNKS AGAINST APARTHEID

Punks Against Apartheid follows a firm tradition of anti-racism within the punk movement. This encompasses punk rockers’ early embrace of reggae, the formation of Rock Against Racism and the Two Tone movement, the music of the Clash and Bad Brains, X-Ray Spex and MDC, Subhumans and The Specials.
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Never mind Johnny Rotten, real punks boycott Israel

By Alexander Billet

Johnny Rotten’s racism does not represent the core vaules of punk rock.

(Ed Vill / Wikipedia Commons)

“If Elvis-fucking-Costello wants to pull out of a gig in Israel because he’s suddenly got this compassion for Palestinians then good on him. But I have absolutely one rule, right? Until I see an Arab country, a Muslim country, with a democracy, I won’t understand how anyone can have a problem with how they’re treated.”

These words weren’t spoken by Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman. They didn’t crawl from the bile of AIPACNewt Gingrich or some hardened, right-wing ideologue from the heart of the Israel’s illegal settlements. They came from the mouth of John Lydon, a.k.a. Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols.

Most devotees of punk rock stopped taking Lydon seriously well before he started shilling for Country Life butter. To be sure, any and all credibility he once had from his work with the Pistols, or, for that matter, later on with Public Image Ltd (PiL), flew out the window years ago.

It’s also true that the Pistols idiotically paraded around in swastikas during their early years. Still, even taken with that grain of salt, Lydon’s words are profoundly troubling. Like it or not, the former Rotten is considered a granddaddy of punk rock. It’s not far fetched to imagine someone reading his words and thinking his flagrant racism, his willful defense of an apartheid state, are somehow the punk norm. It’s for this reason that Punks Against Apartheid exists.

In the summer of 2011, Punks Against Apartheid came together as an ad hoc formation of BDS activists and punk fans (a formation that, in the interest of full-disclosure, includes this writer). The goal was initially modest: draft a letter and petition urging Jello Biafra, formerly of The Dead Kennedys, to cancel his gig in Tel Aviv with his band The Guantanamo School of Medicine.

The response was overwhelming: within four days, Punks Against Apartheid’s petition had more than 500 signatures (“Sign the petition: Tell Jello Biafra to cancel the gig in Tel Aviv,” 16 June 2011).

As pressure built and Biafra publicly reaffirmed his commitment to the show, he specifically called out Punks Against Apartheid. However, a few days after that, with the petition bearing more than a thousand signatories, Biafra canceled the gig (“Jello Biafra cancels Tel Aviv gig,” 29 June 2011).

Furthermore, many of those who had supported us were urging Punks Against Apartheid to continue as a formal network.

Now, Punks Against Apartheid has finally launched its official website:www.punksagainstapartheid.com. Of course, the group doesn’t exist in isolation. The global movement for boycott, divestment and sanctions is at a crucial international turning point. With the Arab revolutions and the anti-capitalist Occupy movement in close to 100 countries inspiring a new generation of rebel musicians, there may be no better time for Punks Against Apartheid to announce its formal presence.

“Racism Ain’t Punk”

Punks Against Apartheid follows a firm tradition of anti-racism within the punk movement. This encompasses punk rockers’ early embrace of reggae, the formation of Rock Against Racism and the Two Tone movement, the music of the Clash and Bad Brains, X-Ray Spex and MDC, Subhumans and The Specials.

There’s more than a little romance to the idea that all of this came out fully formed somehow. On the contrary, it had to be fought for both in the concert halls and on the streets. In both the US and the UK, open white supremacists vied for support within the punk movement during these early years. In a climate of economic crisis and harsh anti-immigrant scapegoating, the angry wail of punk was initially just as liable to trail into some dangerously dark territory. (Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?)

And just like today, there was an international dimension that was difficult to ignore. Punk groups like National Wake from Johannesburg, South Africa were shut down and prevented from playing just like Black Flag in Los Angeles — though in the former’s case it was usually due to it being an integrated band in an apartheid state. The pleas from Nazi boneheads like the UK’s National Front or the American National Socialist Party to “support white South Africa” obviously had the effect of dividing the global punk community rather than uniting it.

No surprise then that the anti-racist side also embraced the worldwide movement against South African apartheid. David Widgery, one of the founders of Rock Against Racism, recalled in his book Beating Time that South Africa was a key part of Rock Against Racism’s message. Its publication, Temporary Hoarding, featured pictures of the Soweto uprisings on its cover. The same issue made a case that, as Widgery put it “our little Hitlers had their big brothers in power in South Africa.” The Specials, with their infectious blend of ska and punk energy, were particularly moved to support the anti-apartheid movement — most famously and obviously in “Free Nelson Mandela.”

When Steven Van Zandt, a guitarist in Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, formed Artists United Against Apartheid and declared “I ain’t gonna play Sun City,” Joey Ramone and The Dead Boys’ Stiv Bators were among those who recorded the single. Countless other punk acts heeded that same call and pointedly refused invitations to perform in South Africa — including The Dead Kennedys and Public Image Ltd.

The parallels between apartheid South Africa and modern-day Israel have been laid out again and again. Areas designated “off limits” to Arabs and Palestinians, systematic denial of basic rights. Forced removals, refugee camps and checkpoints. Random raids of homes and violent repression of anything smacking of resistance. Though it’s been almost twenty years since white rule was abolished in South Africa, its ancestor is alive and well in a similar colonial settler state.

Of course, punk rock hasn’t gone anywhere either. For every sugary corporate Green Day ripoff willing to cross the Palestinian people’s international picket line (I’m looking in your direction, Simple Plan), there are untold numbers of young folks forming their own bands, their own labels and own fanzines because they believe punk stands for something. It’s these people that Punks Against Apartheid seeks to reach.

And believe it or not, despite the stubbornly persistent notion that punk remains a white boy thing, many of these punks are those most under the gun of American racism, a racism that has become more pronounced since 11 September 2001.

“Being a punk and being a Muslim-American to me go hand in hand,” says activist and writer Tanzila Ahmed. “They are both about standing up to the man. They are about believing what you believe with your whole gut and soul … It’s about being marginalized and fighting to reclaim your voice.”

Ahmed, or “Taz,” as she is known, is one of many participants in the burgeoning Taqwacore scene: Muslim punks. It’s a sub-culture that is currently taking its rightful place next to riot grrl and Afro-punk in the ever expanding horizons of a diverse punk scene.

In an interview with The Electronic Intifada, Taz also insisted that her identity as a Muslim punk is a big reason she supports BDS: “The US government is largely why Israel feels empowered to bully the way it has … It’s all about political power, and at this point of history hate speech against Muslims is the tactic and Muslim-Americans are the pawns. I absolutely believe that the lack of support for Palestine is the sacrifice politicians are making to stay in power and to win votes.”

Bigger than Jello

Thirty years ago it was open fascists emboldened by a political establishment who turned the other cheek. Now it’s white nationalists milling around the ranks of the Tea Party andthe “Stop Islamization” crowd. Back then they pointed at jobs and services “stolen” by black people and higher crime rates in the inner-city. Today they shriek about Arabs and Muslims conspiring to impose sharia law via downtown mosques.

Back then, both gutter racists and establishment politicians alike looked to South Africa as a bulwark against the invading brown hordes. Today, it’s Israel. Global empire doesn’t care about apartheid. On the contrary, without divide-and-conquer, it probably wouldn’t survive.

As always, the fight is international. Amplifying the shouts of those shoved to society’s margins doesn’t end at national borders. Perhaps that’s why the original Punks Against Apartheid petition included signatories from all over the world — London, Beirut, Chicago, Istanbul, Paris and beyond.

It’s also perhaps why a glimpse of those who have signed on to Punks Against Apartheid’s “points of unity” so far will reveal a diverse swathe: “Spirit of ‘77” originators The Angelic Upstarts, anarcho-punk architects Oi Polloi and the Oppressed, riot-folk singer Mark Gunnery, radical torch-bearers Propagandhi and more.

Of course, Punks Against Apartheid is tapping into something much bigger than any list or artists, bigger than Jello Biafra, John Lydon, or even “Elvis-fucking-Costello.” Punk rock’s legacy, twisted and contradictory though it may be, had to be fought for and can still mean something to a new generation. Ultimately, it’s about solidarity. If the world’s most marginalized are ever going to take back what’s theirs, then this is one value that has to remain at our very core. Time to show the world that punk is a lot more powerful than any divisions — real or imagined — ever could be.

Written FOR

WHAT MAKES A HERO? …. AND HOW YOU CAN HELP MAKE ONE

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I received an email from Yoav Shamir. He is an Israeli director/producer/cinematographer.
In part, here is what he had to say;
I hope you are well. I am writing to you because I know you appreciated my previous films such as “Checkpoint” and “Defamation”, and I need your help with my new film “10% – What makes a hero”.*

Before I proceed with what kind of help am I asking for and why -let me tell you a little bit about the film.

“10%” is my new feature length documentary- it deals with a very simple question: “What make some people do good, while most people look away? What makes some people do good even when there is a potential personal toll? Some people will refer to them as Altruistic, some will call them heroic.

Examples from recent history would be the Non Jews who saved Jews during the holocaust, even though there was a serious risk potential doing so, the white South Africans who fought Apartheid while most whites enjoyed the benefits of this racial system, those few who straggled alongside the ANC paid many times a serious personal toll.

Are there some common patterns to all the individuals mentioned above? Common traits? A Psychological blue print?

The film follows a Stanford University research that attempts to tackle this question, as it highlights Palestinian and Israeli peace activists. The head researcher is the famous Prop. Philip Zimbardo (who back in the 70’s conducted the famous “Stanford Prison Experiment”), alongside with an Israeli and a Palestinian team.*

Best to see what Yoav has to say about the film….*

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To read more about Yoav Shamir and to find out how to help produce the 10%, go to THIS Website. Keep in mind that no money is coming from the big shots in Hollywood…. this is truly a people’s project for the people.

U S CONGRESS TO PALESTINE: STATEHOOD OR SESAME STREET….

You can’t have both!
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‘Young children should not be penalized’
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Palestinian Sesame Street put on hold

Iconic children’s program ails because of funding freeze by US Congress as punishment for UN statehood bid

It’s quiet time on Palestinian Sesame Street.

The iconic children’s program, known as “Sharaa Simsim” in Arabic, has been put on hold for the 2012 season because of a funding freeze by the US Congress.

*Adding insult to injury….*

Even as the freeze put Palestinian Sesame Street on hold, the State Department is investing $750,000 in the Israeli version of the show, which is now filming its newest season with an emphasis on teaching children the value of fairness.

This is what the US Congress is putting a halt to….

*Promoting message of peace, tolerance

“Sharaa Simsim”, the Palestinian show, debuted in 1996 and has produced five seasons since, with long intermissions for fundraising. It has promoted a message of peace and tolerance that Israeli critics say is often missing from Palestinian airwaves.

The main characters Haneen, a red-headed orange Muppet, and the green rooster Kareem have became household names for Palestinian children.*

The full AP Report can be seen HERE

THE WAR AT HOME IN SONG … WHY WE OCCUPY

The legend of Woody Guthrie continues with the poetry and song of Joseph Bruchak. Joe is a poet and author by profession, specialising in Native American stories. He has written many children’s books dealing with Native American lore. 
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Yesterday, the following was reported in the New York Times regarding long overdue honours rewarded to Woody; click HERE to read the article …Bound for Local Glory at Last
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Woody Guthrie, Around 1943
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Also yesterday, Joseph and Jesse Bruchak posted the following on YouTube… Enjoy!
December 28th, A special day for People’s Art!
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A MUSICAL INTERLUDE (WITH APOLOGIES TO GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL)

 HALLELUJAH CORPORATIONS
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The 1% praise corporate greed…..
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